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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I am weak on this lift. I think.

My understanding is you lift the bar to your chest, right? I find that as the poundage is increased, there is a sticking point just about 1-2 inches before I can get the bar to my chest. I can move it all the way up but the full ROM (range of motion) is inhibited.

I think this is a weakness at the biceps and wrist muscles level. Anyway that's where I seem to "feel" it. I'd like to be able to do this lift with full ROM. So I have two questions:

1. Should you, indeed, move the bar all the way up to the chest? Or does it not really matter?
2. If it's not my biceps & wrists that fails at this sticking point, what is? (IOW what muscles can I work on a little extra to get myself to the point where I can do this movement completely?)

P.S. I don't seem to notice ROM problems with other back lifts, e.g. pullups, deadlifts, dumbell rows. It's just this one lift.
 

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I never liked that exercise. Sometimes I think they say to bring the barbell to your stomach, I don't know I think it's a pretty crappy exercise either way. I don't think it does your lower back any good though it helps to rest your head on something I think. Bent arm pullovers on a machine or leg curl bench is probably the best lat developer IMO. I do like seated rows though and I do them a lot. I do them with the bench press unit of my home gym with a little padded board that I rest my chest against and the board rests against the leg press arm with foot rest removed. But that probably helps nobody unless you have the same kind of machine. :um
 

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I think barbell rows are a fantastic lift. They are a staple of every pro bodybuilder.

I think bringing them all the way to your chest is essential to fully tax the lats. It sounds like your biceps are giving out early. Just lower the weight for full range of motion and eventually your biceps will catch up.

I usually bring the bar to my lower chest with a very wide grip. Find the line that works best for you.
 

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The dumbbell row is probably a better choice. You can support yourself with the other hand which is better for the lower back and you get a greater range of motion at the top.
 

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Well if you guys insist on doing barbell rows :b for what it's worth from the book Brawn on proper techinique...

Good technique means keeping the knees bent and the abdomen "sitting" on the upper thighs. The upper-body is at an angle of about twenty degrees to the ground. Keep the head up and grip the bar at about shoulder width. The initial pull is done by moving the arms, not by swinging up with the back to get the bar moving. If you yank at the bar, you're inviting trouble. Like in the deadlift, there's no yank.

Once the bar is well on it's way to touching your abdomen, or lower chest, then there's some synchronized movement of the upper-body with the arms-a smooth motion. Experiment with different width grips and pulling a little higher or a little lower. The grip can either be palms down(pressing grip) or palms up (curling grip). Form can be kept strict by keeping the forehead placed on a comfortable waist-high bench. This is a good way to learn to do the exercise without yanking the bar and putting your lower back at risk.
 

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http://www.exrx.net/Lists/Directory.html

this site shows all you need to know on exercises.

Straight lower back with bent knees and a 45 or so degree angle of your back. feet about shoulder width apart find a comfortable position. Use mirrors.

Also your grip may be giving out early so lower the weight and/or use a mixed grip of one palm facing towards you and one away.

Pull the bar towards your stomach. you should touch or nearly touch your stomach.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I know this is an older post, but as an update I've figured out that if I keep my back at a slight incline like Gumaro and torquexj mentioned (if that makes sense, instead of being parallel to the ground) it works better. I looked over how the form should be and the consensus seems to be that you aren't completely parallel anyway, but for some reason I was demanding to myself that I should be. So now the lift works better.

My wrists are what are weakest. They still do want to give out a bit at the top of the lift, but I'm able to execute it. It's helped for me to do high-rep lifts for now and to do auxiliary exercises for the wrist muscles in the meantime.

Thanks for the tips guys. :)
 
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