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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seems like everyone focuses exclusively on what one should or should not do in order to lose body fat or look better or whatever. Myself included. Maybe that works for some people, but it is NOT working for me.

I'm going to try to apply therapeutic CBT and ACT principles to my overeating. I have focused far too much on what I'm doing, without asking what is going on with my thoughts and emotions along with the overeating. I think approaching my diet from a psychological point of view will be the most productive.

For some reason, very few people seem to take this approach. Any idea why? And, does it seem like a good idea for me to do this? It seems to me that those of us with chronic overeating problems should be spending time asking ourselves why we behave the way we do around food, rather than just playing the role of internal drill sargeant.

I'll let you know how it goes for me.
 

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To be successful with a diet, it is going to take mental discipline. I think all diets take a psychological approach in that sense. Im not sure exactly what you mean by it.

I think its a great idea for you to figure out what causes you to overeat, but when it comes down to it your going to have to be your own mental drill sergeant to overcome this.

My suggestion would be to make a planned diet. Count your calories and plan out every meal for every day. With this type of dedication, it leaves little room for cheating or overeating.
 

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Barring a genuine problem with metabolism, weight problems probably always have a psychological basis. I think understanding why I eat badly or consume more than i need or even enjoy, is important if I'm going to improve.

Likewise, knowing why I feel a need to improve, especially if that need to improve causes me pain, is very important.
 

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Barring a genuine problem with metabolism, weight problems probably always have a psychological basis.
I've known quite a few happy overweight people. They just weren't all that concerned with their appearance and barring any health problems, they probably don't have any interest in losing weight.

For most overweight people, though, it's probably is psychological. When you feel bad about yourself, eating is something you can do to temporarily make yourself feel better. It's like an addiction -- the same reason people do drugs or drink. Sometimes it's all people have. If you don't have other things in your life that make you happy, cutting down on the one thing that does is very difficult.

So, if you do things that make you feel better about yourself, whether accomplished using CBT, ACT, or just working on your self-esteem, then you'll find it easier to control your eating.
 

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There is a big physical factor in losing weight. You can't lose fat cells, so you can actually end up with starving fat cells when you lose weight even if you end up at normal weight.
 

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I think the ability to lose weight or not is definately connected psychologically. I really want to lose weight. I know how and I've done it before. But on the other hand, fat is a defense mechanism- the less attractive I am the less people will want to interact with me. I sometimes hermit and overeat when I'm feeling pressured to be social. The correlation is clear in my behaviours. I know I keep the weight on purpose subconciously - I'm hoping to remedy that now that I'm being more proactive in treating my SA/depression.
 

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sometimes i can't tell if i'm hungry or if it's my anxiety or depression..so i've basically lost touch with my natural body signals..luckily i don't eat very much in the way of junkfoods.
 

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Wrennie said:
I think the ability to lose weight or not is definately connected psychologically. I really want to lose weight. I know how and I've done it before. But on the other hand, fat is a defense mechanism- the less attractive I am the less people will want to interact with me. I sometimes hermit and overeat when I'm feeling pressured to be social. The correlation is clear in my behaviours. I know I keep the weight on purpose subconciously - I'm hoping to remedy that now that I'm being more proactive in treating my SA/depression.
Totally can relate to this.........I feel so much safer when I'm heavier.......Actually happier in a strange way! At the same way, another tool for self abuse!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am now working through this online workbook (it's free btw and I think it will help me):

http://www.selfhelpmagazine.com/article ... index.html

She says it very well:

I found myself frustrated that many people looked for an answer in a diet or exercise program. I got angry that desperate frightened people were being promised answers via diets and exercise programs.

Reasonable diet and exercise programs, if followed consistently, help provide a person with health and strength. But when programs completely bypass such underlying issues of eating disorders, the programs are doomed to fail.

The tragedy is that often the person doesn't know it was the program that failed. The person with the eating disorder, all ready racked with guilt and self-punishing thoughts, is certain that he or she was the failure. This only perpetuates despair.
 
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