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Alien
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those of you who are in a really competitive or intense program, how to you cope with it and anxiety? I've been struggling... The workload they give us doesn't allow me time to socialize, which then means I can't work on my social anxiety. I try to work with other people when I can, but it's not always possible...My general health hasn't been doing too well either. And sleep...what sleep?

Can anyone relate?
 

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You push through it and do the best that you can. In medical school, we had to work 6 days/work, typically starting from 5-6AM and ending at 6-7PM, going home and having to read for another 1-2 hours each night. Every 4th or 5th night, we were on call. I missed a lot of meals and I missed a lot of sleep. Now, looking back, it was a growing experience that I will never forget. To reach your goals and dreams, you have to make compromises and sacrifices.
 

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Alien
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I can't even imagine medical school. Especially since it doesn't end with a four year degree. I love what I do and I enjoy the work (the majority of the time), but I worry about how it's affecting me mentally. For someone without social anxiety it isn't a big deal, but in terms of CBT/exposure I don't feel like I'm getting as far as I should. I wish the work we had was more communal so I could push myself a little harder. Right now my social skills are the worst part, more so than the fear.
 

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giraffe
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I did an accelerated nursing program. We started out with 78 people and 12 graduated. I was one of the 12 but I had a nervous breakdown right after I transferred into the second portion of the program where we get our Masters and had to take a break. Thankfully I finished my basic nursing degree that allowed me to work, but it was so stressful getting it done. You had to have over 78% to just pass and even if you had an A average and you got below 78% on the final you still failed. Oh, and we had 9 credit classes the last few semesters, split into 3 portions: 6 hour lecture, 12 hour clinicals every weekend, and 4 hour lab; but you were only graded on 6 tests for lecture and clinical and lab were pass/fail. My pulse went up to like 144 back then and my arrhythmia kicked in and I was always anxious and it was just terrible. :no So glad it's over! I had a lot of pressure from my family to succeed, so if I had failed before I graduated I don't think I could have handled all the disapproval and sense of failure. Just push on through no matter how hard it gets. I just basically shut down my entire life and focused on studying and doing paperwork and keeping track of everything that was required to graduate. I also developed insomnia and basically ended up becoming very sick. I wish I could tell you some magic solution but I don't have one. :/ Just focus on the end goal and you will get through it. I got through by sheer willpower and by reminding myself that it wouldn't last forever. I learned a lot about what was important to me though, and now I'm taking my time with my next degree and I'm a lot happier and healthier.
 

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You push through it and do the best that you can. In medical school, we had to work 6 days/work, typically starting from 5-6AM and ending at 6-7PM, going home and having to read for another 1-2 hours each night. Every 4th or 5th night, we were on call. I missed a lot of meals and I missed a lot of sleep. Now, looking back, it was a growing experience that I will never forget. To reach your goals and dreams, you have to make compromises and sacrifices.
Are you talking about residency? Or the first 4 years?
 

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Are you talking about residency? Or the first 4 years?
That's just med school. You work 6 days a week and take call, just like the residents.

I'm going into radiology so residency might actually be fewer hours than medical school :yes

I can't even imagine medical school. Especially since it doesn't end with a four year degree. I love what I do and I enjoy the work (the majority of the time), but I worry about how it's affecting me mentally. For someone without social anxiety it isn't a big deal, but in terms of CBT/exposure I don't feel like I'm getting as far as I should. I wish the work we had was more communal so I could push myself a little harder. Right now my social skills are the worst part, more so than the fear.
As diamondheart89 alluded to, sometimes there's just no good way to fit everything in and you have to prioritize what's important in your life. You can try to stay as balanced as possible and make the most of your time but that's as much as you can do. Life doesn't always progress optimally but in the end everything will work out even if it seems hard now.
 

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I'm in my first year of medical school and so far it hasn't been too bad. 1st unit was adjusting, 2nd took studying all day, all of the time, the unit we're on now seems easy, and I'm actually having trouble coping because it's so much less work, and I can't study as easily, or know what to do with myself. Really, for any competitive program, a mixture of discipline and balancing time management are the key.

I'm going into radiology so residency might actually be fewer hours than medical school :yes
Are you in your 4th year? Any advice for an MS1, as far as where I should be spending my time? Right now I'm in a position to honor my first classes, which I will try to do, but I've heard that this makes very little impact on residencies. Next year, I plan on studying throughout the whole year, as I go through classes, to do well on the boards, and I know that 3rd year rotation performance is very important, but is there anything else I should be doing?
 

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I'm in my first year of medical school and so far it hasn't been too bad. 1st unit was adjusting, 2nd took studying all day, all of the time, the unit we're on now seems easy, and I'm actually having trouble coping because it's so much less work, and I can't study as easily, or know what to do with myself. Really, for any competitive program, a mixture of discipline and balancing time management are the key.

Are you in your 4th year? Any advice for an MS1, as far as where I should be spending my time? Right now I'm in a position to honor my first classes, which I will try to do, but I've heard that this makes very little impact on residencies. Next year, I plan on studying throughout the whole year, as I go through classes, to do well on the boards, and I know that 3rd year rotation performance is very important, but is there anything else I should be doing?
Yep. I'm in my 4th year. 2.5 months of rotations before I'm all done.

Work hard during your first two years but honestly very little you learn in your first two years is actually relevant to clinical practice. Most physicians will tell you that the transition from your M2 to your M3 year is probably the biggest transition you'll ever make in your path to becoming a physician.

And, yes, 3rd year is all about "performance." Very little of the grading is actually dependent on your clinical knowledge or reasoning. A lot of your grading is subjective and dependent on your team's perception of your ability to work with others, communication skills, relationship with patients, taking initiative, ability to respond to feedback, oral presentation skills...you know stuff us people with SAS suck at. So, be prepared to get hammered a little on your grades if you aren't the most charismatic person in the room.

But, hey, you get through it. And at some point, you will no longer be judged on your ability to suck up and show off and you can just focus on practicing medicine and helping patients. That's why I'm looking forward to residency.
 
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