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Cool story, bro!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a job interview scheduled for Tuesday. It's a good job too starting off at 16 dollars an hour with pay increases very frequently. The end payout is probably in the mid 20's. But my desire and motivation is non existent. I'm living at home right now after being discharged from the Army with Avoidant Personality Disorder. I'm literally considering acting like I go to the interview in the city but just walking around instead so my family doesn't question me.

I had a job doing this same thing before at another hospital but quit after 1 week because I was so stressed out and everyday at work all I could think about was leaving. Alot of times I would just walk outside and hang out there because I didn't want to be doing it.

The interview consists of a panel of people too. Last time it was 10 people interviewing me at once. I just don't know if I can handle it.

Plus I then think about all the specifics if I DID get the job. It's 60 miles away and I'd have to take a ferry across the puget sound to get there every day. I live 3 miles from the ferry terminal without a car so I'd be forced to walk back and forth. That's like 8 miles of walking per day to do something that will just depress me even more.


I'm so confused and hopeless.
 

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The better prepared you are for your interview, the less anxious you will feel. Try to write down all possible questions that could be asked during the interview, and find answers for all of them and remember them. Practise.

Research about the company and job you are applying for. Talk about what you know about the company during the interview and ask some questions about it.

During the interview, when your asked a question, you can take a couple of seconds before you answer, don't rush your answers, take your time, breathe, and talk slowly. Try talking with a smile on your face if you can.

Even if you decide you don't want the job for X reasons...I would suggest you still go. It's a valuable experience. Just go there as if you have nothing to lose. In the end, if you get the job and still don't feel ready for it, you can always refuse it. But go to the interview. Do it!
 

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SAS Member
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They will probably ask you why you left your old job so be sure to have an answer for that. On the plus side, if you do get the job you could probably move to a close location, which also means you'll be able to live on your own.
 

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I have a job interview scheduled for Tuesday. It's a good job too starting off at 16 dollars an hour with pay increases very frequently. The end payout is probably in the mid 20's. But my desire and motivation is non existent. I'm living at home right now after being discharged from the Army with Avoidant Personality Disorder. I'm literally considering acting like I go to the interview in the city but just walking around instead so my family doesn't question me.

I had a job doing this same thing before at another hospital but quit after 1 week because I was so stressed out and everyday at work all I could think about was leaving. Alot of times I would just walk outside and hang out there because I didn't want to be doing it.

The interview consists of a panel of people too. Last time it was 10 people interviewing me at once. I just don't know if I can handle it.

Plus I then think about all the specifics if I DID get the job. It's 60 miles away and I'd have to take a ferry across the puget sound to get there every day. I live 3 miles from the ferry terminal without a car so I'd be forced to walk back and forth. That's like 8 miles of walking per day to do something that will just depress me even more.

I'm so confused and hopeless.
Doesn't even sound like you want advice on the job interview. And really, you could always move closer to the job or find another one. I think you really don't want any job at all.

My theory is that when people ask for advice they really want encouragement. On the inside you always know what to do, but sometimes your scared to do it. So you hope someone will give you the advice to do what you wanted to do all along and that will take the fear away.

My experience is that this never works.
 

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I think you should go ahead and do this. I don't know about you, but for me, passing up on opportunities leaves me feeling worse than if I try something and fail. If this interview doesn't go that great, at least it will be an experience and make a second interview easier to do.

You said your last job stressed you out. Well, a week is maybe not enough to let you get used to something new. I think if you stick with it long enough, the anxiety will gradually decrease. Let that good pay be a motivation :D

Good luck, I really hope this turns out well.
 

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Cool story, bro!
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think everyone's advice/insight here was great. I do think I will go just to get the experience, and to fight back against my anxiety. I know it will never go away but I don't want to let it ruin every opportunity I ever have. I don't WANT to work at all. But who does?

To the person who mentioned having a reason I left my last job, I don't list that place on my application for that exact reason. I tell people my last job was the Army and that's usually sufficient.

I think a valium before-hand will do the trick.
 

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unashamed perv
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That's great, I'm glad you're going to go! :)

What's wrong with walking? It'll be so good for you! It's good for your body to get exercise, and I find a walk at the end of the day is a wonderful way to de-stress. Or you could get a bicycle? That would also give you some exercise and make your journey quicker.
 
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