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I have the same question. I don't have a family doctor, though. I'm afraid I'll ask the "wrong" kind of doctor and they'll think I'm stupid and won't be able to help me. Is there a specific type of doctor you're supposed to ask?

Do you just go and when they ask what the problem is, just say "I have social anxiety?". I know that Doctors often get a bit pissed when patients "diagnose" themselves...will this make them less likely to help me?

I just want some sort of idea of how the whole interaction generally goes.
 

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I have the same question. I don't have a family doctor, though. I'm afraid I'll ask the "wrong" kind of doctor and they'll think I'm stupid and won't be able to help me. Is there a specific type of doctor you're supposed to ask?

Do you just go and when they ask what the problem is, just say "I have social anxiety?". I know that Doctors often get a bit pissed when patients "diagnose" themselves...will this make them less likely to help me?

I just want some sort of idea of how the whole interaction generally goes.
A therapist will help you with social anxiety although their methods will more be along the means of talk therapy or cognitive behavioral therapy. A psychiatrist's job is to find the right med that will help you and they are the only ones who can prescribe meds. Your general doctor you go to see for a check up will generally not have a lot of knowledge about psychiatric things like social anxiety disorder although they may be able to prescribe meds as well, I don't really know what they can and can't prescribe. Letting any of these doctors know exactly what your suspicions are of whatever kind of diagnosis you think you might have will do nothing but get things moving more quickly in the right direction. Of course if you go in and declare that you are 100% positive that you have social anxiety disorder or whatever else and that you refuse to listen to or explore any other possibilities than anyone is going to be a bit annoyed, but no doctor is going to be pissed or annoyed with you just for showing that you have explored what condition it is you think you might have. They will be appreciative and will ask you some more questions about that subject.

The usual interaction usually starts just as you stated: doc: "so, what can I help you with" You: "Well, I feel like I may have social anxiety. I am very anxious around people and its really making me depressed..." etc. etc.

I find most docs will usually pause a long time after you stop talking and it may make you feel like you said something dumb or something but I think this is just a strategy they have of making sure you have gotten all of your thoughts out as well as observing your reaction during this pause. If you are figiting or looking away quickly during this pause it may be indicative of some kind of anxiety or if you stare right down at your feet it may point to depression. In other words don't think they are thinking you are stupid during this pause, they are just observing your non verbal ques of how you are feeling which are usually a lot more raw and revealing than any words we can say. They are doing this in an effort to help you.
 

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Before seeing a pdoc for the first time, I thoroughly review my symptoms and make my own diagnosis with evidence and proof from previous experiences. I worked as a Paralegal for quite a while so its like writing a Verified Complaint to be heard in court before a Judge e.g. being the doc. I type out my case, plenty of bullets, feelings, where my SA disables my potential, the goals that I want to fulfill and what I feel may help medication wise. Then I read this to the doc slowly and work with him to come to a solution, Sometimes my diagnosis is correct and they agree sometimes they shed light on another issue I overlooked but either way I go prepared and get alot out of it!! Great Luck...by the way, I shoot up a prayer to My higher power before the appointment, somethin like Thy Will Be Done...Peace
 

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What kind of doctor are you going to? I'll share my doctor story, maybe it'll be of some use to you:

I went to my primary care physician/general practioner/family doctor. He's been my doc my whole life (23 years). I'd been to him for mental health issues before (depression). He came in the room, shook my hand, said it had been a while and asked me what was going on. I said that things had been going downhill for a few years, and he started asking questions about school, my family, etc. At one point, he mentioned how I have never made eye contact with him, in all the time over the years I've been in his office, and that started me on the anxiety thing. I said that I realized my anxiety isn't normal, and described how I feel in certain situations. He asked a few questions. Then he asked me what I wanted, and I told him something fast-acting for anxiety, to go with the Zoloft I wanted for depression. He immediately offered benzos without me even saying the word. Gave me a scrip and instructions and said to come back in 4 weeks.

My experience may be somewhat unique, in that I went to the same doctor I've been using for my whole life, so there's an added element of trust I think.

Regardless, I would say you think you have an anxiety problem and describe your symptoms. It may not be a good idea to say "I've done a lot of reading on the internet and I'm pretty sure I have Social Anxiety Disorder and I think the best course of treatment is x." Express your concerns, see what your options are. In my case, I did specifically say I wanted something fast-acting in the hope of getting benzos (or anything else that's fast-acting). From reading on here, it seems docs want to always start with SSRIs and don't like benzos. In that case, perhaps ask if you could get something fast-acting, just for the short term, until the SSRIs have time to work.
 

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The reason I go prepared because sometimes my brain goes blank when asked a question on the spot especially from a professional!
 

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Before seeing a pdoc for the first time, I thoroughly review my symptoms and make my own diagnosis with evidence and proof from previous experiences. I worked as a Paralegal for quite a while so its like writing a Verified Complaint to be heard in court before a Judge e.g. being the doc. I type out my case, plenty of bullets, feelings, where my SA disables my potential, the goals that I want to fulfill and what I feel may help medication wise. Then I read this to the doc slowly and work with him to come to a solution, Sometimes my diagnosis is correct and they agree sometimes they shed light on another issue I overlooked but either way I go prepared and get alot out of it!! Great Luck...by the way, I shoot up a prayer to My higher power before the appointment, somethin like Thy Will Be Done...Peace
VERY good advice. Of course you don't have to go so far as to arrive at a self diagnosis. Just the outlining of your troubling thoughts, emotions, anxieties etc. is the most helpful thing.
 

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The reason I go prepared because sometimes my brain goes blank when asked a question on the spot especially from a professional!
hehe exactly the reason that caused me to prepare before hand and write down what I wanted and needed to bring up at the doctors. Really helps though, you get your situation across alot more effectively and don't forget as much. :yes
 

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Take the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale to start: http://www.socialanxietysupport.com/disorder/liebowitz/

That should give you some idea of where you stand in terms of severity and give you some ideas of what to talk about in terms of where specifically you have problems with SA.

You could even print out the result and hand them to your doc.

Good Luck.
Your score:
47(fear) + 47(avoidance) = 94
You have severe social phobia.


80-95 is severe. +95 is very severe. I was floored...stomach tight.

I don't know about that test. I'm 2 points off being very severely socially anxious according to it.
Reading through the SAS page though I don't relate with it that well. I don't get any big symptoms, I don't get panic attacks.
 

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Those questions are very subjective, especially the fear ratings, along with most questions regarding the 'severity' of an emotion. How can we know what is moderate or severe when we have no way of knowing, or feeling, what a 'normal' level of anxiety is? I used to say as a kid how sorry I felt for people with depression when those prozac commercials were on, and yet I was clinically depressed and suicidal everyday. I just simply thought everyone felt the same way but they just delt with it better. It was only until I got on adderall that I suddenly and accidentally realized why it was so much easier for everyone else to not break down into tears four times everyday for no reason.

I scored a 130 by the way.
 
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