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I grew up in a house where fundamentalist christianity brewed. I thought the Earth was 6,000 years old and there were dinosaurs when man walked the Earth.

Then I grew up. Well, it took a while. Somewhere in my 20's. I'm 36.975 (lol).

My questions is really in regards to a question I have. Do christians ever really completely transition to atheism or agnostic-atheism? I ask because sometimes I have found myself wishing for a God or a divine nature or an after-life, something to close the holes and explain the unexplainable and eliminate any sense of despair.

Can anyone share similar hesitations? In fact, a few times I have mused that even if most people went to hell and a few went to heaven, that might be better than there being no after-life. Why? Because at least there's a meaning for things and no stone is left unturned.
 

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I grew up in a house where fundamentalist christianity brewed. I thought the Earth was 6,000 years old and there were dinosaurs when man walked the Earth.

Then I grew up. Well, it took a while. Somewhere in my 20's. I'm 36.975 (lol).

My questions is really in regards to a question I have. Do christians ever really completely transition to atheism or agnostic-atheism? I ask because sometimes I have found myself wishing for a God or a divine nature or an after-life, something to close the holes and explain the unexplainable and eliminate any sense of despair.

Can anyone share similar hesitations? In fact, a few times I have mused that even if most people went to hell and a few went to heaven, that might be better than there being no after-life. Why? Because at least there's a meaning for things and no stone is left unturned.
raised catholic and full blown atheist
 

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I was raised christian. Sometimes i hope someone who believes in an afterlife is right. Sometimes i hope it just ends. I don't believe or disbelieve anything though. So yeah, some of us leave it behind. I'm agnostic now.
 

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I wasn't raised to be religious. But when I hit about age 13, I went into this very strong Christian 'phase' where I was all about Jesus, I went to this Christian camp for years and eventually became a counsellor, teaching other young girls about Jesus. I started to sink into a deep depression at age 17-18, as well as studying science at university (when I slowly began to recover), and by age 20 I became an atheist and I've never looked back.

Personally, I think my fascination with Christianity and Jesus stemmed from a desperate desire to belong, to be accepted and loved unconditionally, and religion seemed to offer that, for a while. But I'm a very analytical person and the more I learned about the science behind nature and the universe, my faith just never held up to that, I questioned it to death.

Sometimes I still think of myself as 'spiritual, not religious' in the sense that I'm seeking meaning and purpose and peace and looking for a way to feel connected with something larger than myself... But I honestly feel that I could never go back to believing anything supernatural, it just makes no sense to me. Although I do understand what it's like to be in great need of spiritual comfort to the point of believing in supernatural things... that used to be me, but not anymore.
 

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Yup, raised Pentecostal, now an atheist. I sometimes envy the religious in the same way I envy anyone who expresses a strong passion for something that bonds them with other people.
 

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I was raised as a Christian but not in a particularly religious home. I stopped being a Christian at the age of 13. My dad's not a Christian so he's been very supportive of me.
 

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Personally, I think my fascination with Christianity and Jesus stemmed from a desperate desire to belong, to be accepted and loved unconditionally, and religion seemed to offer that, for a while.
Most people don't realize it, or will even admit to it... but that is exactly why they are religious.

I just hate the hyper sensitivity... Lets act like its the end of the world because I said "****" (a word with sub-culturally different connotations) in front of your children.

You are drinking alcohol...??!? OMG lets murder everyone.
Smoking cigarettes...?>?>?> YOUR (yes your not you're)** a Nazi.

You only learn through going outside your comfort zone, and religious people can suck my dick all at once because they want everyone to conform to their little boxes of anti- free thinking. If some book written by ancient primitive people says it... it must be accurate, if they decide it is. If not, then no its false. (LOLZ)

On the other hand... this hyper sensitivity/naivety makes them super easy to manipulate.

Rant Complete.

**to imply ignorance

and yes I was raised Christian... I was fine with the whole Coexist thing until I moved back in with my parents... moving out next week due to the fact I want to kill myself if I have to stay here.
 

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I had always considered myself Christian, because my mom was and so is most of her family. It wasn't until I attended a private school during middle school that I became an atheist. Sometimes I find myself wishing there was some type of afterlife, or something to look forward too after? In the end I still like to consider myself a full atheist. I just find it easier. If there really is an afterlife, so be it. But I'm not going to sit here and try to figure it out. I have more fun things to do!
 

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I grew up in a house where fundamentalist christianity brewed. I thought the Earth was 6,000 years old and there were dinosaurs when man walked the Earth.

Then I grew up. Well, it took a while. Somewhere in my 20's. I'm 36.975 (lol).

My questions is really in regards to a question I have. Do christians ever really completely transition to atheism or agnostic-atheism? I ask because sometimes I have found myself wishing for a God or a divine nature or an after-life, something to close the holes and explain the unexplainable and eliminate any sense of despair.

Can anyone share similar hesitations? In fact, a few times I have mused that even if most people went to hell and a few went to heaven, that might be better than there being no after-life. Why? Because at least there's a meaning for things and no stone is left unturned.
I was raised in a Lutheran household and my parents tried to keep me mostly among Christians (didn't want me around my best friend often because he was an atheist, but they let me occasionally since his live-in grandma was Catholic). I was a Christian for most of my life, but some parts of the religion really bothered me as I got older. Despite believing in God and Jesus, I never really liked church but had to go. I was raised in an environment where we were taught that humans are sinful creatures and that going to church was a must. When I first heard about The Big Bang and Evolution, I was told lies. My church was one of those that seemed to think that the scriptures weren't necessarily all literal, but Adam and Eve were frequently mentioned. It was also a church that avoided a lot of the worst parts of The Bible and presented stories such as Noah in a happy way.

There's a lot more to say, but to skip ahead, I do not desire a god or an afterlife. If we're talking specifically about the god of the Tanakh, New Testament, Quran, etc., I think he's a dick and wouldn't serve him if he existed. I don't have a desire for another god, either. As for an afterlife, I'm in no way opposed to people working on extending human life or giving us an option to live as long as possible. At this point, I'm not sure that I'd want either for myself, though, but that probably wouldn't be the case if I wasn't depressed.
 

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Raised a cheery, happy Catholic. Now a complete nihilistic, pessimistic atheist. Hooray.
LOL raised a somewhat blissfully ignorant nice little sheltered Christian. Now working towards etho-sociopathism and general douchebaggery with a focus on Nihilism (in regards to peoples responses to my actions). AND I LOVE MY LIFE.

Etho-sociopath- All the traits of a sociopath except I don't do anything that I wouldn't want done to myself... which is only murder.

Steal my property - I have insurance.
Fight me - Well if can't defend myself then I am pathetic.
**** me over in a business transaction- That's life, live and learn.
Hurt my feelings- LOL I hope to never be this weak - where I let another person's actions hurt my self worth.

ROFL this was supposed to be a short post.... then i made up a WORD.
 

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I was raised Catholic now agnostic. Ive never really understood the religion until sooner in life and later agreed that this was not what I believed in.
 

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My questions is really in regards to a question I have. Do christians ever really completely transition to atheism or agnostic-atheism? I ask because sometimes I have found myself wishing for a God or a divine nature or an after-life, something to close the holes and explain the unexplainable and eliminate any sense of despair.
I mean, you learned it from birth, it was taught to you by the people you respected and trusted more than anyone in the world. Of course you're never truly going to get over it. I mean damn, I'm not even truly over Santa Claus.
 

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Maybe not. I considered myself agnostic for a while. I was born Catholic but never agreed with its teachings. I've become more of an atheist as I've gotten older but there's still a part of me that thinks there's a greater something we're connected to. I think its the universe. I just don't think that the universe cares about what we do or whether or not we eat meat on Fridays.
 

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Eternal Slack
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I was raised Catholic, lost my faith in college when I started learning more about other cultures and how the concept of a god just didn't make much sense any more. I now realize that we all have just one life to live, we might as well make the most of it and enjoy ourselves.
 

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I come from a pretty strict christian family. I hated going to church few times a week, just because my parents say so.

I've lost my faith when I was 15, 16. I still have good opinion on christianity tho. It teaches people to have good moral values, that's the most important thing. If everyone followed the 10 commands, world would be perfect.
 

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I come from a Christian family. When I was 8 we came to Canada to live and when I learned that people around me were of other religions I started questioning Catholicism and the Papacy. I guess we could say that I became somewhat of a Protestant at the age of 9 without knowing it. At the age of 10 I learned more about other religions and when I was in school and I had first heard of evolution I started rejecting Christianity more and more.

By the age of 11 I had already become agnostic and I am still one since I haven't really thought about the existence of a God or Gods.

As far as I'm concerned my parents think I'm protestant because I have clearly announced to them that I reject the orders of the Pope. They don't know I'm agnostic although I have already joked about many aspects of Christianity such as the concept of confession.
 

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I'm not gonna lie, being an ex-Lutheran part of me will probably always hang on to the notion of the Christian God, or redemption or salvation, sin, etc. Family members nagging, my own wondering of the world and fear of death. Its all been heavily instilled to my upbringing. And I wasn't raised in anywhere-near a fundamentalist family.
 

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I was raised Catholic. I went to a Catholic primary school (run by nuns), and a Church of England secondary school. Never really joined in much, because of the social anxiety. I went through all the hoops, like first confession, first communion, and Confirmation. Then I stopped going to church at 18. It was as late as 18 because I didn't have the guts to say "I'm not going to church any more".
I still get on with my parents though.
 
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