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-   -   Meditation and Mindfulness (https://www.socialanxietysupport.com/forum/f59/meditation-and-mindfulness-84154/)

Helena_SAS 02-26-2010 02:18 PM

Meditation and Mindfulness
 
Meditation is a mental discipline where you attempt to get beyond the conditioned, "thinking" mind, into a deeper state of relaxation or awareness.

Similarly, mindfulness is being aware of your thoughts, actions or motivations.

More Info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meditation

Helena_SAS 02-26-2010 02:24 PM

Mindfulness-based stress reduction
 
(Copied over from old review system)

Posted by StressReduction
I guess this is sort of a second-hand experience, but I work at a psychology lab that does research on Social Anxiety Disorder, and as part of our study, we offer clinical interventions to people who suffer from social anxiety.

Through my work, I have seen people go from terrified of the smallest social interaction, like saying hi at the grocery store, to believing in themselves and giving presentations in front of groups. I know that I've learned a lot from just being a part of this, and I hope others can benefit too. That's why I wanted to share my experience.

If you or someone you know is in the San Francisco Bay area is looking for
help (specifically, free therapy), contact the CAAN lab at the Stanford Psychology Department:
650-723-5977 or email us ([email protected])

At the website you can find out more about our study: http://waldron.stanford.edu/~caan/Free_Treatment.html

movingforward80 05-09-2010 04:17 PM

Meditation Really Works for Me
 
I've had anxiety ever since I could remember. I couldn't join a yoga class because of my SA. So, I found a someone who does meditation. I meet with her once a week to do some meditation and it works wondering for me. The negative thoughts and voices I had are subdued and now I know how to fight them. I'm been suffering from the negative thoughts for most of my life and I finally got some relief. I feel like I can do anything now.

Volcom23 05-12-2010 02:40 AM

I'd already tried meditation and I'm working on it now. I still don't see any results but I could see that my negative thought patterns are slowly subduing. I don't know if meditation really helps me but the idea of mindfulness guided me in my everyday life. Mindfulness is good. Any good books can you suggest that will help me in doing my daily meditation?

sarafinanickelbocker 06-09-2010 12:11 AM

I want to train myself to think in the present more. Does meditation help with this? Any suggestions? Thanks.

MissMay1977 06-10-2010 05:54 AM

I practice meditation and it helps me. I am working on being mindful. I dissociate a lot.

movingforward80 06-10-2010 07:26 PM

Hi
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Volcom23 (Post 1382814)
I'd already tried meditation and I'm working on it now. I still don't see any results but I could see that my negative thought patterns are slowly subduing. I don't know if meditation really helps me but the idea of mindfulness guided me in my everyday life. Mindfulness is good. Any good books can you suggest that will help me in doing my daily meditation?

I actually have a meditation coach that also does therapy. So, she is like a second therapist to me. Most of the sessions are individual so she tailors the meditation to how I'm feeling. I'm so thankful for her because I only pay her $10 a session. Perhaps, you can see if there's any free meditation circles or individual sessions around your area? Personally, I need interaction. Books don't work for me.

OregonMommy 06-10-2010 07:27 PM

Meditation and mindfulness is the main way I deal with my mental problems, has helped more than any pill does and in an organic way, obviously.

movingforward80 06-10-2010 07:29 PM

Hi
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Drew (Post 1275464)
(Copied over from old review system)

Posted by StressReduction
I guess this is sort of a second-hand experience, but I work at a psychology lab that does research on Social Anxiety Disorder, and as part of our study, we offer clinical interventions to people who suffer from social anxiety.

Through my work, I have seen people go from terrified of the smallest social interaction, like saying hi at the grocery store, to believing in themselves and giving presentations in front of groups. I know that I've learned a lot from just being a part of this, and I hope others can benefit too. That's why I wanted to share my experience.

If you or someone you know is in the San Francisco Bay area is looking for
help (specifically, free therapy), contact the CAAN lab at the Stanford Psychology Department:
650-723-5977 or email us ([email protected])

At the website you can find out more about our study: http://waldron.stanford.edu/~caan/Free_Treatment.html

That would be cool if they gave free sessions over the phone.

movingforward80 06-10-2010 07:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hoady (Post 1418083)
Yeah i know the whole shindig on Presence and Meditation.I find it difficult to meditate, get uncomfortable negative physical sensations relating past experience through marijuana but i reckon i will shake it off overtime.

As for the meaning of Mindfulness its amazingly helpful,actually it was probably the thing that first brought me back to reality after a very long time especially to at least address my social issues.

I think if you keep on practicing meditation; you will get better at it. It's like building a muscle.

LeDiskoLove99 06-11-2010 02:44 PM

I've really been thinking about meditation. I think perhaps it could help me with a lot of problems I have, especially all of the negative thoughts that keep me down. But I'm not quite sure if I should do it or not yet.

But it sounds like a great thing.

VagueResemblance 06-11-2010 04:32 PM

These things helped me immensely with clinical depression and bipolar disorder, lasting long-term, almost twenty years. Basically I realized how the emotions form, what thoughts and beliefs lead me where, and changed a few details. Now for a two-week period I might have one or two bad days; seven-eight months ago I would have thirteen.

End result is that I'm a whole different person. Change is scary, but good. It's been a shock and sometimes still is; I sometimes stop and burst into tears on seeing a shape in the clouds, or hearing a bit of music or birdsong; I haven't seen beauty in these things since I was a child.

Against anxiety it is difficult; under the pressure of dealing with other people my emotions usually still run away from me, but I've made some substantial progress. No medication. Before I stopped seeing her for lack of funds my last therapist told me I'm doing cognitive-behavioral therapy on myself. That was nicely encouraging. :)

Brax 06-11-2010 04:44 PM

I have been thinking about this for a long time. If I did it try it, I would need something that both does its job and doesn't rely too much on non-secular ideas. I'm typically unimpressed by theism. So it sounds like the 'real, authentic' practices that people tend to push as ideal wouldn't be ideal for me. No chakra, no chi, no ego obliteration. Something more general that I can at least better personalize and ritualize, perhaps, if I can find nothing better.

VagueResemblance 06-11-2010 05:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brax (Post 1419815)
I'm typically unimpressed by theism. So it sounds like the 'real, authentic' practices that people tend to push as ideal wouldn't be ideal for me. No chakra, no chi, no ego obliteration.

Then have a read: wikipedia page on mindfulness as psychology technique, divorced from religion and mysticism, though it does reference those.

Honestly I've never thought of it as mindfulness, but after several months of the practice stumbled on the description and was pleasantly surprised. To me it is nothing more than a higher level of self-awareness. Standing aside to watch oneself think, along with the ability to direct those thoughts to some extent, very useful in managing moods. I've got some minor social thing coming up tonight, in an hour, and the usual fear/anxiety/panic is simmering in the back of my head.

It's become a conscious choice to keep it there at a level I can easily manage, or let it flare out of control and keep me home as has been happening for years. I'm going.

Badgerrrs 06-29-2010 12:15 PM

Trying it.
 
Hi,

I am trying to meditate a few times a day for my S.A alongside my CBT.

I am quite hopeful it will help with the thoughts that are always in my head.

Paul

anxiousgirl79 06-29-2010 01:31 PM

Mindfulness I can handle, but I have a hard time meditating because my mind races so much!

Ameles 07-20-2010 04:04 PM

For those wanting to learn more about meditation and mindfulness, you may find it helpful to listen to some dharma talks. I've always found the talks at http://www.audiodharma.org/ very good. http://www.dharmaseed.org/talks/ has quite a lot of talks also. They're quite good to listen to for beginners and those experienced in meditation.

OregonMommy 07-23-2010 07:40 PM

Guided audio CDs can help a lot for those (including me!) who have a hard time for sitting and meditating, and for beginners. I like Jon Zabat Zinn's audio CD's for meditation, especially. Also Buddhist meditation CDs such as by Pema Chodron and Jack Kornfield. There are many.
For myself, for therapeutic reasons, it helps to sit with something that bothers me most, to sort of aerate it, release the attachment to it. Sometimes it can take more than once or more for some things and only once for other things. It has helped me develop further insight, without getting too much in my head about them. Then I always focus on compassion, peace, love, joy, what I want to call the higher level states, no matter what I incorporate that into the meditation.

toughcookie 07-23-2010 09:31 PM

I've been making attempts at meditation for years, but I have to buckle down if I'm going to get anywhere. I do much better at it when in a group of people who are meditating. I've been told that the energy between the people makes it much easier to do things like meditation and yoga. I definitely find this to be true for yoga.

Anyway, I think meditation is super important for people with SA :)

allex 08-03-2010 02:31 AM

Yes, meditation really helps, but it take time and sometimes it's too difficult to make yourself to meditate, it helps when you do it regularly. I think this method is righter but still prefer medications due to quick effect


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