LSD/hallucinogen therapy - Page 2 - Social Anxiety Forum
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post #21 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 05:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Tuan Jie View Post
The reason why the initial research into treating mental health patients with hallucinogens stopped, was because hippies started to use it as a party drug. There's much more to it than the bad rep these drugs got because of it. It took more than half a decade for science to finally pick up the research where it had hastily been abandoned due to the end of funding. And this is exactly where it belongs, in the hands of scientists. I'm glad there are some who dare to go against popular belief and refuse to throw away the baby with the bathwater.
Yup. I assume you've seen Neurons to Nirvana? If not, I highly recommend it.

When LSD and and psilocybin were discovered, it was considered a huge breakthrough that was going to revolutionize the fields of science and medicine. Ironically, it essentially was them making people too peaceful and introspective, making them less likely to want to join the army, that got them banned. The government got too freaked out and decided to make them illegal and halt all research on them.

The crazy fact is that micro-doses of psilocybin mushrooms and LSD is one of the most quick, long-lasting and overall effective means of combating mental ailments such as anxiety and depression; studies confirm this. Anyone who thinks these drugs were banned because 'they're bad' need to watch the documentary Neurons to Nirvana, a doc which I guarantee you'll find to be an eye opener. I also recommend you read up on the latest research on psilocybin.
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post #22 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 05:06 AM Thread Starter
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@sad1231234 There's a big difference between taking hallucinogens and hallucinogen therapy.

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post #23 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-14-2017, 12:20 PM
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Does Las Vegas have good places to obtain them?
The internets has something very similar... I'd say it counts, It's basically the same thing.
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post #24 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-14-2017, 12:26 PM
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I personally know someone who almost died on mushrooms. Good luck if you want to blow your brains out.
Was he a young *** teen kid like you? Immature and had no idea what he was doing, just wanted to try something that he wasn't ready for?

There are plenty of studies about mushrooms being used for therapy with positive results.
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post #25 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-14-2017, 12:31 PM
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This sounds like a real bad idea.
Hw so? What are you basing this on? Apparently not on any scientific studies, or experience with LSD. I tried LSD a few times and was always happy as ****.
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post #26 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-14-2017, 12:33 PM
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In my early teens I did LSD regularly for about 2 years and it was the greatest thing in the world. But then I had a bad trip and my life was forever changed for the worse. I stopped using LSD after that bad trip. All my mental health issues can be traced right back to that bad trip. I was actually hallucinating for years after that bad trip; it was as if the LSD never left my brain. I had mild anxiety before the bad trip but since then it completely amplified my anxiety, caused insomnia, panic attacks, suicidal behavior, and OCD.
You were young, immature and abused it.
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post #27 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-14-2017, 03:27 PM
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Hw so? What are you basing this on? Apparently not on any scientific studies, or experience with LSD. I tried LSD a few times and was always happy as ****.
Wait until you have a bad trip; you won't go near that **** again.

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You were young, immature and abused it.
Irregardless, I am still informing users or potential users the risks associated with LSD use.

And wet she rose from the lake, and fast and fleet went she
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Saying "Course well, my brindled hound, and fetch me the jet black mare
Stoop and strike, my good grey hawk, and bring me the maiden fair"
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post #28 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-14-2017, 03:43 PM
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Was he a young *** teen kid like you? Immature and had no idea what he was doing, just wanted to try something that he wasn't ready for?

There are plenty of studies about mushrooms being used for therapy with positive results.
Oh give me some etizolam will you?
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post #29 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-14-2017, 06:02 PM
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Tried some peyote 4 years ago.


Definitely an "after-glow". Resets your brain. Makes your brain unresponsive to any other drug.



I'd probably recommend a go every year or two.

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post #30 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-14-2017, 08:07 PM
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Originally Posted by forever in flux View Post
I'd tread carefully as hallucinogens could make things much worse.

.
^^ this,
I knew lots of people who self medicated and ended up in the psych hospital. Several of them killed people after the self medication. And one guy cut his dick of then flushed it down the toilet.

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post #31 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-14-2017, 08:18 PM
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Originally Posted by jealousisjelly View Post
Was he a young *** teen kid like you? Immature and had no idea what he was doing, just wanted to try something that he wasn't ready for?

There are plenty of studies about mushrooms being used for therapy with positive results.
Cite them then.
I see this small study with only 12 people:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedh...ion-treatment/
Magic mushroom ingredient tested as depression treatment

Wed, 18 May 2016 12:33:00 EST
"Magic mushrooms 'promising' in depression," BBC News reports. Magic mushrooms is an umbrella term for fungi that contain psilocybin, a psychoactive substance that can cause intense LSD-like hallucinations, as well as reported feelings of euphoria and "spiritual insight".
Researchers gave two doses of psilocybin to 12 volunteers, all of whom had moderate or severe depression that had not responded to other treatment. As this drug is controlled in the UK, permission from the Home Office was needed for the study, and the participants were closely monitored by psychiatrists.
The intention was to monitor the "intensity" of the experience, as reported by the volunteers, to see if it was feasible to use psilocybin to treat people with severe depression. The researchers also wanted to get an initial impression of its effects.
They found the 12 volunteers tolerated the drug, with minor side effects that did not last long. Eight of them had no symptoms of depression one week after treatment, and five were free from depression after three months.
But because of the type of study this is and its small size, we can't be sure if these results are the result of psilocybin.
The researchers warn that people should not try to treat themselves with mushrooms that contain psilocybin. Aside from their unpredictable effects, magic mushrooms are class A drugs that are illegal to possess – which can carry a seven-year jail sentence – or distribute, which can result in up to life imprisonment.
Where did the story come from?

The study was carried out by researchers from Imperial College London, South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, King's College London, University College London, the Royal London Hospital, and the Beckley Foundation.
It was funded by the Medical Research Council.
The study was published in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet: Psychiatry on an open-access basis, so it's free to read online.
While overall the UK media reporting was accurate, The Sun newspaper wins the most inappropriate headline of the month award (and is currently a leading contender for 2016).
Their headline, "Magic mushrooms make you a fun guy", manages to both trivialise the life-limiting and often horrible impact severe depression can have, while simplifying the complex results of this study.
The Sun also used a stock photo of a classic twentysomething cheesy raver with the caption: "Professor Nutt, who worked on the study, was previously sacked as the Government's chief drug adviser in 2009". The distinguished 65-year-old psychiatrist may be a little put out (or possibly amused) by this.
The Daily Mail was also overenthusiastic in its reporting, saying that "Hundreds of thousands of people could benefit from antidepressants derived from magic mushrooms", despite the limited nature of the study.
However, both The Guardian and The Independent give a more measured account of the study and its limitations.
What kind of research was this?

This was an open-label feasibility study designed to test whether the drug psilocybin could be safely given to selected patients with depression, alongside psychological support.
Everyone in the study took the drug, meaning there was no comparison group and everyone knew that they were taking the drug.
That said, it is hard to imagine what could serve as a placebo for a drug (psilocybin) notorious for its hallucinogenic properties.
This type of early-stage trial cannot give us reliable information on efficacy – nor is it set up to do so.
Even if such a trial suggests possible effectiveness, it's hard to be sure whether the results are truly down to the drug or whether they could reflect an "expectation" effect, where people immediately felt better because that is what they expected.
What did the research involve?

Researchers publicised their study, saying they wanted to recruit people with depression that had not responded to other treatments to test psilocybin. Only 12 of the 72 volunteers met the study requirements.
After physical and mental health tests – including checks to make sure the volunteers were not at high risk of psychosis – they were given two doses of psilocybin in hospital, one week apart.
The first was a low dose to check for unexpected reactions, while the second was a high dose aimed at treating depression. The day after treatment, people were asked about their experiences, including the intensity of psychedelic effects (on a scale of 0 to 1) and any unpleasant effects.
Everyone was followed up regularly, by telephone or email, from the day after the high-dose treatment until three months afterwards. Participants filled in questionnaires designed to monitor depression symptoms.
Researchers compared depression scores from before the study began, one week after treatment, and three months after treatment.

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post #32 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-14-2017, 08:18 PM
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What were the basic results?

On average, people rated the intensity of the experience as 0.5 for the low-dose and 0.75 for the high-dose treatment. Psychedelic effects typically appeared from 30 to 60 minutes after taking the dose, peaked after two to three hours, and were no longer detectable after six hours.
Nobody had to be sedated during the treatment. The main side effects were feeling anxious (which happened to everyone), confusion, nausea and headache. None of these side effects lasted. Average depression scores decreased at one week and remained lower at three months.
Because the study is so small, it may be more useful to look at what happened to the individuals, rather than average depression scores.
After one week, eight people responded to the medicine with reduced depression scores of at least half their previous score, suggesting a big improvement. Seven of them fell into the range that suggested they no longer had depression.
However, most people's depression scores increased over the next three months, and only five of the original 12 volunteers were still free from depression at the end of the study.
At the end of the study, six people had mild or moderate depression, and one person once again had severe depression.
How did the researchers interpret the results?

The researchers said that: "Done with appropriate safeguards, [such as careful screening and therapeutic support] psilocybin can be safely administered" to patients with depression.
They admitted that the study design means "strong inferences cannot be made about the treatment’s therapeutic efficacy" – in other words, we can't be sure that it worked. They went on to say that: "The data do suggest that further research is warranted".
They pointed out that it is rare for people with severe depression to recover spontaneously without treatment, and most of their participants had lived with depression for many years.
They have called for a bigger randomised controlled trial to properly assess how well this treatment works.
Conclusion

Depression is a disabling disease that affects many people in the UK. While antidepressants and therapy work for many people, some people don't fully respond to treatment.
A treatment for depression that uses a drug that works in a different way from existing antidepressants could be very helpful.
Having said that, this study doesn't tell us whether psilocybin is a useful drug for treating depression. This was a very small, early-stage trial that only aimed to see whether the drug was safe and has potential for use – the researchers did not set out to see if the drug is effective for treating severe depression.
Here are some points to consider:
  • Ten of the recruits had referred themselves, rather than being referred by a doctor. This means they actively sought out treatment with psilocybin. Interestingly, five of the 12 had taken psilocybin before, which may mean they joined the study because they already thought the treatment worked for them.
  • There was no control group and no placebo – everyone was given the treatment and knew they were taking the treatment. This means we don't know whether the treatment itself or another factor, such as the intensive therapeutic support from psychiatrists, might have caused the improved depression scores.
  • The chart showing the depression scores for each individual shows that most people (not everyone) had a big initial drop in depression scores by one week after treatment, followed in many cases by a fairly sharp upswing in scores after that. This could mean that the experience of having the treatment has a short-term effect that wears off fairly quickly for most people.
Researchers and funders will review the results of the study and decide whether to build on this with a large randomised controlled trial.
This would give us a better indication of whether this treatment could work for people with depression who are not helped by current treatments – and, most importantly, whether it's safe for use.
The researchers warn that people should not try to treat themselves with mushrooms that contain psilocybin. Aside from their unpredictable effects, magic mushrooms are class A drugs that are illegal to possess or distribute.
We imagine that because of the ongoing political controversies around psychoactive drugs like psilocybin, ketamine and MDMA being used to treat mental health conditions, a larger follow-up phase II trial is not guaranteed to take place.

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post #33 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-26-2017, 05:05 AM Thread Starter
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Didn't know there was so much going on in this thread lately... Thanks for all your contributions. I'll read up later.

I talked to my psychiatrist about this and told him I wouldn't have to think twice if I'd get the chance to volunteer in a trial. He doesn't know much about it, but he promised me to talk to his colleagues about it. Not long after he mailed me a trial with psyloscibine may start not far from where I live in the near future. He couldn't tell me much more about it because he officially doesn't know yet and it's not certain if it'll take place at all. I hardly dare to hope, but I'd be more than grateful to get what could be the chance of a lifetime.

Recently there has been a massive conference on the subject, organized by MAPS and the Beckley Foundation. A whopping 120 video's about it have been released and are freely available on
. I haven't watched them all, off course, but I get the impression this cat has gotten out of the bag and won't be tabooed back into it anymore. It's about bloody time science gets it's well deserved chance to properly determine the therapeutic potential and/or dangers of the whole gamma of demonized/abused substances in question. If the jaw dropping results of some preliminary studies can be replicated in significant numbers, some people in this field are going to get a Nobel Prize.

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post #34 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-28-2017, 10:35 PM
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I've heard that one of the things about acid is there's like a curtain in your brain between the subconscious and the conscious mind and when you take acid it peels back the curtain, so you can become much more in tune with what's going on in your mind. I'd like to experiment with acid but my brain is too volatile I can barely handle too much weed. I took acid a few times when I was younger only couple of times had any effect, the last time i took it was a bit of bad trip, i freaked out a bit but not massively compared to some panic attacks i've had in past when high from pot.

Its one of my many regrets about my life, I would love to be like Ken Kesey the 60s acid head / writer who took huge amounts of it in the quest for self knowledge and psychological experimentation. That would be so much fun and so liberating, but my mind is way too unstable and prone to anxiety to be able to handle it. I remember reading a book that my mate had on drugs and it was written in the 1950s I think and it was written by these intellectual scientist types who were experimenting on themselves with hallucinogens like LSD and peyote, their experiences sounded fascinating.

Recreational drugs can be dangerous things, but they also be wonderful and life changing as well. I think with harder drugs though it can be a bit like playing russian roulette sometimes.

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post #35 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-28-2017, 10:43 PM
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Had a friend who only did acid once and it took away a lot of his anxiety permanently.

The first time I did acid it made me feel the most hopeless I've ever felt in my life and I was anxious as **** for two weeks following the trip.

It's a tricky thing lol.

take one day at a time
anything else you can leave behind
only one thing at a time
anything more really hurts your mind


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post #36 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-28-2017, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by rockyraccoon View Post
In my early teens I did LSD regularly for about 2 years and it was the greatest thing in the world. But then I had a bad trip and my life was forever changed for the worse. I stopped using LSD after that bad trip. All my mental health issues can be traced right back to that bad trip. I was actually hallucinating for years after that bad trip; it was as if the LSD never left my brain. I had mild anxiety before the bad trip but since then it completely amplified my anxiety, caused insomnia, panic attacks, suicidal behavior, and OCD.
Sounds terrible man, I had slightly similar situation for me where my many psychological problems started not long after I started smoking pot regularly as a teen. Young minds are still growing and developing so putting these drugs into them can throw a spanner in the works (to put in rather mildly). That's the thing with drugs like pot and acid, for most its like hey what's the big deal just a bit of fun and it is but for every 1000 or so that take them you might get 1 that has a volatile brain and you throw some strong drugs into it it can wreak havoc sometimes permanent.

Bad luck for the young poet would be a rich father, an early marriage, an early success or the ability to do anything well - Charles Bukowski
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post #37 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-30-2017, 08:26 AM Thread Starter
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@SuperMetroid
Sorry for my late reply, but thank you for sharing. I haven't seen the documentary, but I've downloaded it and I will watch it. I've seen a couple of other items and documentaries. So far, I didn't look much into micro-dosing, but it keeps popping up on my radar from time to time. Although the high dose treatments are not a silver bullet, they appeal more to me because they seem to bring about lasting change in perception. But I'm also interested in micro-dosing. A Really Good Day by Ayelet Waldman is on my list of books to read.

@VanDamMan
I don't know the slightest thing about peyote, but what you shared sounds like what I've heard about other substances that are currently researched. For convenience sake, I'm just going to treat psychoactives as a group here. Perhaps you can shed some light on a question I've had for some time. It seems like there is a long lasting effect if you take, for instance, a high dose of psiloscybin. Someone in this thread replied earlier that you'll be back in the same default a long time later. The effect wears off, so to say. What I think would be optimal, is to use the altered state of mind while it lasts, to bring about as much change in your life as you can. I haven't come across anything in this regards, so I'm curious if you have been able to distill some lessons from your experience in this regard. In other words, what would be the right thing to do after the treatment/experience? Is it possible at all to make the change last?

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post #38 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-30-2017, 09:03 AM
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@VanDamMan
I don't know the slightest thing about peyote, but what you shared sounds like what I've heard about other substances that are currently researched. For convenience sake, I'm just going to treat psychoactives as a group here. Perhaps you can shed some light on a question I've had for some time. It seems like there is a long lasting effect if you take, for instance, a high dose of psiloscybin. Someone in this thread replied earlier that you'll be back in the same default a long time later. The effect wears off, so to say. What I think would be optimal, is to use the altered state of mind while it lasts, to bring about as much change in your life as you can. I haven't come across anything in this regards, so I'm curious if you have been able to distill some lessons from your experience in this regard. In other words, what would be the right thing to do after the treatment/experience? Is it possible at all to make the change last?
2 parts.

First part is the physical effect. The "after-glow" can last 3-8 weeks afterward. It gradually dissipates. A lot of alcoholics and drug addicts find it much more useful than any current medication in pharmacies.

2nd part is the emotional. They say when you take peyote, you should think about any long term issues you have. Hopefully after the peyote has worn off, you're still left with the emotional insights you had that were holding you down. But yeah probably is similar to other psychedelics.

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post #39 of 100 (permalink) Old 05-30-2017, 09:12 AM
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lovely brightening experience at school


felt like being pre-school age again
making everyone laugh. sharing it
it upped my social abilities

important for any music events

medicine for the soul
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post #40 of 100 (permalink) Old 06-01-2017, 12:09 PM Thread Starter
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Just found a related thread on SAS from @Beanybean called Had great Experiences with high doses of Psilocybin.

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