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-   -   What Do You Like About Your Town? (https://www.socialanxietysupport.com/forum/f341/what-do-you-like-about-your-town-2236337/)

XebelRebel 09-27-2020 02:13 PM

What Do You Like About Your Town?
 
Dear SAS forum members, what do you like about your town, city, or place of dwelling?


I say "place of dwelling" as some people live in the countryside, in houses which are not even part of a popularly recognised urban area. So for those people, I am asking them what they like about the area around their houses; not what they like about their houses. However -- it is OK for people to say what they like about their houses too. Honestly, it will simply be quite nice if someone here responds to me.


I love to go for walks around my town, and I especially love to go for walks in the woods. There are several forests: the largest of them has a little cafe at the bottom of a valley, in a small clearing surrounded by trees. I very much like to go there for a cup of tea, and perhaps a slice of cake as well. It is not unusual to see a squirrel or two, while calmly sitting at one of the tables with one's hot drink. I find it so relaxing there.


By the way, I know what sort of pictures might come up when one does a web search for Goddess Lilith, but I am actually very pretty -- and friendly! :smile2:

leaf in the wind 09-27-2020 02:46 PM

I live in Montreal, Quebec. It's one of the OG settlements in Canada so there's more history here compared to most places in the country. It has an economy that actually includes those not in the service industry. The culture is pretty chill. Housing costs are comparatively lower than other major cities. The rapid transit system is decently developed and growing. Dating is a lot easier.

harrison 09-27-2020 03:43 PM

I live in Melbourne, Australia. There are aspects of it I like but things I don't. I'll try to focus on the positive.

Huge cafe culture here, lots of little laneways where you'd think you were in Italy or something. Lot of Italians, and people from basically everywhere. (which is mostly okay but not always)

I like the city centre - the trams, the parks are nice, but it's getting very crowded. Huge influx of people. At one point recently I think they said there were something like 2000 people arriving here on average every week. That tends to make the trams a bit crowded. :roll

tehuti88 09-27-2020 03:55 PM

Low COVID-19 rate...so far. :/

leaf in the wind 09-27-2020 04:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by harrison (Post 1094021285)
I live in Melbourne, Australia. There are aspects of it I like but things I don't. I'll try to focus on the positive.

Huge cafe culture here, lots of little laneways where you'd think you were in Italy or something. Lot of Italians, and people from basically everywhere. (which is mostly okay but not always)

I like the city centre - the trams, the parks are nice, but it's getting very crowded. Huge influx of people. At one point recently I think they said there were something like 2000 people arriving here on average every week. That tends to make the trams a bit crowded. :roll

I like Cafe culture. Montreal has a brunch culture - it's a thing to line up for 45 minutes on our weekends to eat oversized portions of eggs, sausage, and fruit smoothies. All of this pre-covid though of course.

harrison 09-27-2020 04:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by leaf in the wind (Post 1094021303)
I like Cafe culture. Montreal has a brunch culture - it's a thing to line up for 45 minutes on our weekends to eat oversized portions of eggs, sausage, and fruit smoothies. All of this pre-covid though of course.

Sounds a bit like here. I don't really know anything about Montreal tbh. Not sure how big it is.

You'd probably like it here though - most people seem to.

I grew up in Sydney - which I actually miss. It's very different to here. The city's got more energy, the harbour is amazing, the beaches etc. Great city - but you probably need to have grown up there. Melbourne people sort of hate it.

leaf in the wind 09-27-2020 04:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by harrison (Post 1094021307)
Sounds a bit like here. I don't really know anything about Montreal tbh. Not sure how big it is.

You'd probably like it here though - most people seem to.

I grew up in Sydney - which I actually miss. It's very different to here. The city's got more energy, the harbour is amazing, the beaches etc. Great city - but you probably need to have grown up there. Melbourne people sort of hate it.

I don't do well in the heat so Australia wouldn't be my first choice for a new residence. But it's definitely on the list of places to visit (+New Zealand).

Montréal is about 4 million people in the metro area. It's an okay place to live - It has all the big city amenities but the pace is slower, less of a rat race feeling. As an anglophone, my options are a lot more limited however.

harrison 09-27-2020 04:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by leaf in the wind (Post 1094021325)
I don't do well in the heat so Australia wouldn't be my first choice for a new residence. But it's definitely on the list of places to visit (+New Zealand).

Montréal is about 4 million people in the metro area. It's an okay place to live - It has all the big city amenities but the pace is slower, less of a rat race feeling. As an anglophone, my options are a lot more limited however.

I just did a quick search - Montreal looks lovely! Very pretty place.

Yeah, Melb and Sydney can get a bit hot. You sort of get used to it. I don't actually mind the heat (until I get hot then I complain about it)

Raies 09-27-2020 06:00 PM

I'm live in two cities depending on whether I'm working or studying.

The studying city has a very good public transport system, and a lot of choices for hobbies.

The working city is a smaller place, and is very pretty (lakes, nature), and during months that aren't winter, very friendly to ride a bike around.
(During winter there's so much snow that occasionally its just impossible, as it isn't cleared fast enough).

JH1983 09-27-2020 06:14 PM

I just moved this month to an unincorporated community with a population of 400. It's 4 miles from a town of 7000 that has some stores and restaurants.

The main things I wanted when I bought the house were to be closer to my work and not living in town. It's got a 0.6 acre yard, so that's big enough. Plus it's 4 miles out of town. Can also hop on the interstate and get to work in less than 20 minutes.

Don't know a ton about the surrounding area yet. There's a large lake and recreational area nearby. There's a nice little diner not too far that serves breakfast in the evening, which is good for me since I work nights. Housing costs are very low compared to what I see talked about here.
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Tetragammon 09-27-2020 07:11 PM

I guess where I live is quieter than many areas, and the views of the mountains are nice. And we live very close to a grocery store so we don't have to go far to get what we need; I could walk if I had the motivation. And I think it's a lot cheaper than some places like California where we lived when I was a kid.

Honestly there's a lot more I hate about it; I can't wait to get out of here after my parents are gone. I've hated this state since the day we moved here and that never changed. I hate the kind of people that tend to live around here, as they're mostly religious, conservative, close-minded and intolerant. Plus a large majority of the legislators in Utah tend to be Mormons, which makes it as close to a theocracy as you can find in the U.S. -- they don't call it the "Mormon Bubble" for nothing. I hate that we get both temperature extremes, from freezing snowy winters to triple-digit summers. I have no interest in the outdoor activities that people in this state love like skiing or hiking. And the house we live in is FAR too big for me alone, so the utilities alone will be too expensive.

CarpeLibrum 09-27-2020 08:23 PM

I like that it is safe and quiet. It's close enough to urban areas where there are more interesting happenings and a wider selection of places to eat. But it's far enough where I can live a little slower pace of life or fight someone over a parking spot.

Plus the craft beer is good here so...

Paul 09-28-2020 06:46 AM

I like that it's within a few miles of so many good underpopulated hiking spots, and 3 miles from my favorite [micro] city's beautiful main street. Within my town's own limits there's not much to like, I guess I'd go with the cemetery as the highlight. And there's not much to dislike either, except for "private property" signs and the highway's traffic noise and sidewalk shortage and the local politics.

mt moyt 09-28-2020 07:59 AM

i would say the best thing is that i can take a bus for 15 minutes and be by the sea. theres a sort of boardwalk and i've never seen it very crowded.


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cmed 09-28-2020 09:24 AM

I get all of the amenities of a big city, but since I'm technically not within city limits I don't have to pay the wage tax or dividend tax.

The cost of living is pretty reasonable too considering it's a major metropolitan area. The locals wouldn't think so, but as someone who is originally from New York I have a much different perspective.

I also like that everything is really accessible here. You could easily get by without a car if you had to.

Citrine79 09-28-2020 03:26 PM

My area is home to a well known tourist attraction that brings in visitors from around the world. Not a huge fan of it myself but people seems to enjoy it. Traffic is very light here and you can get around town and the suburbs fairly easily. There is some really rabid football fans here who have quite the reputation for their loyalty and their, uh, wild behavior. Other than that, I dislike much...the weather is terrible almost year round, there isn’t much to do, I find most people to be unfriendly when out and about and did I mention the weather is bad?

RelinquishedHell 09-28-2020 06:01 PM

Affordable and close to some beautiful nature areas. It's also close to Portland, so there's a lot of work opportunities.

CoolLilChickadee 10-01-2020 10:47 PM

Lots of great restaurants, an absolute gem of a metropark system, and a fantastic library system as well.

Evo1114 10-06-2020 08:37 PM

Population: 1,300

Granted, my previous town was small too, but it was a college town (average age was like 20 years old - whereas average age of U.S. is like 40 years old). And I lived smack dab in the middle of the main college housing. Frat house across the street. Two sorority houses a couple buildings down. I go outside here at like midnight and still is weird not hearing yelling drunks or police sirens. Really only retired people or families live in this town. Fine by me!

Scrub-Zero 10-06-2020 09:20 PM

Montreal is a nice city. I like it here.

There's a lot of bike trails that go everywhere and some are even opened in winter. Apartments are still on the cheap but apparently that's changing, we're catching up to Toronto, which is sad for poor people like me.

I wish i could say more things but I'm not much of a tour guide.


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