Asperger's Syndrome? - Page 8 - Social Anxiety Forum
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post #141 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 05:51 AM
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Your Aspie score: 62 of 200
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I thought I'd be less neurotypical.
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post #142 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 06:33 AM
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Interesting.

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post #143 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 06:11 PM
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I was just wondering this! I'd never even heard of AS until about a year and a half ago. I started to intensely research it because I'm interested in social disorders and how they work, since I obviously have one myself. But the more and more I found out about AS the more and more I start to believe there's a possibility I could even have it.
I've been grapling with this issue for almost a year. At first, I thought I might have AS but my psychiatrist wasn't convinced. More recently my psychiatrist is suspecting I might have AS and now I'm not fully convinced. I have sensory issues and obsessions/interests and some social difficulties but I don't think I'm socially blind. I'm not as good as the average person but I don't think that's enough. While I don't take an active interest in other's conversation when socially interacting, I'm aware if I go off tangent, even though I feel like talking more about my interests/myself. I kind of don't listen when conversing but I'm aware of it and catch myself. My psychiatrist said that people on the spectrum tend to talk at you not with you (not engaging in a clear interactive two-way conversation). I'm not sure about this but here's an interesting paper trying to categorize AS into different types including socially anxious ones. I'm not sure how valid these categories are?

Socially Anxious Social Communicator(SASC):

They try to blend in or subtly fade out and others are likely to describe them as shy. They function “under the radar” and often try to appear to others as “fine” but avoid many social situations outside of their family. Those identified as SASC have a highly developed social radar; in fact you could argue they interpret the information they receive through their social radar with exaggeration. Rather than recognize that people have thoughts about each other in mostly benign ways, the SASC is often highly concerned about any thoughts another person is having, even if the SASC logically understands that he or she also routinely has small thoughts about others when around people. This group, we hypothesize, is born neurologically to experience more anxiety and to intuitively doubt their social abilities.

Their resistance to interacting in situations that make them uncomfortable can mean they appear to be more socially limited than they actually are. When comfortable or in their social element (usually around family and close friends), they appear much like a NSC (Neurotypical). However, when their social anxiety emerges, it appears to diminish their access to their social cognition and they appear much more like a WISC (the next group described). The huge shift in their social behaviour from appearing comfortable around others to appearing highly uncomfortable and disconnected from others marks the SASC. When feeling socially anxious, those who are in the SASC group over-focus on their feelings of anxiety and need to retreat from others, leading others to resist interacting with them. This then affirms the need of SASCs for their social anxiety: a catch-22.

http://www.socialthinking.com/images...cp_1.26.10.pdf
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post #144 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 11:26 PM
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^ That's me.

*Edit from the future 2013*
After rereading and learning about myself and reconsidering my past I believe I'm more a WISC. Possibly on the cusp of WISC and SASC.
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post #145 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-29-2011, 03:35 AM
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^^ me aswell

If no man is an island i will take the palm trees and sand.

I live as i choose or i will not live at all- cranberries
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post #146 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-29-2011, 04:23 AM
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I'm not sure about this but here's an interesting paper trying to categorize AS into different types including socially anxious ones. I'm not sure how valid these categories are?
They haven't been validated. I see some glaring problems but they're useful observations. I remember the authors weren't classifying Asperger's alone but social communication ranging from normal to profound autism. The main Asperger's group was the Emerging social communicator (ESC) group, with some falling in the Weak interactive social communicator (WISC) group. I appear somewhere in between these groups (maybe solid ESC) - more on the ESC side but not enough to fit well.
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post #147 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-29-2011, 04:51 AM
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I used to have a profile on an Asperger's site/forum a few years ago, thinking I might be on the same wavelength, but many of the posters seemed to be so arrogant, combative and rude that I left. Maybe SA-Aspies are just a bit less abrasive and more empathetic than those without SA. (I recall being pretty cocky and belligerent, too, when I was little - before the SA really kicked in...)
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post #148 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 03:11 AM
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Simulation of what it can be like walking down the street with autism (but first without - the tedious part you have to watch for a minute first). I identify fully (and it doesn't even cover being overwhelmed by the other senses) because I live it.

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post #149 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 06:18 AM
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This is an interesting video odd one out, thanks for uploading it!

If no man is an island i will take the palm trees and sand.

I live as i choose or i will not live at all- cranberries
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post #150 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 06:57 AM
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Your Aspie score: 114 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 114 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits
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post #151 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-30-2011, 05:14 PM
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Simulation of what it can be like walking down the street with ASD (but first without - the tedious part you have to watch for a minute first). I identify fully (and it doesn't even cover being overwhelmed by the other senses) because I live it.

For those with such sensory issues do you find that sound is by far your worst stimulus? There are times where I've thought that being deaf wouldn't be so bad. I've even thought it would help with SAD but I highly doubt it?
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post #152 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-31-2011, 08:17 PM
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I would honestly go crazy without sound. I think it would be worse than being blind for me. Music makes such a big impact for me, helps me focus. It is a scary thought hearing nothing or just like the sound of a seashell all the time. I can tell where everything is with sound it is just extremely hard to filter things out. Like talking to a person in a conversation within a large noisy area like a restaurant is difficult. All the peoples conversations, the sounds of spoons clanging, tables being cleared, people making reservations across the room, the damn kid wanting to go home because they don't have grilled cheese, the people in the table across talking about the movie they watched. The worst part is trying to concentrate during all that.

Love or hate me as you will, but live now and in your final breath. In time we shall meet again.
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post #153 of 173 (permalink) Old 06-02-2011, 01:16 PM
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For those with such sensory issues do you find that sound is by far your worst stimulus?
Sounds are probably the worst triggers for me, too - the ones I can't control, anyway. Since my early teens, I don't even try to sleep without earplugs anymore.

Noisy people at work mean that I periodically have to play musical chairs - hunting for a seat that's far enough away from them while still being in a lower-lit section that's not too much out in the open... Unfortunately, our department got moved to a tiny part of the call center last year that always has the heat cranked up into the 80s (-thank God for my fan) and on top of fluorescent lighting, it also has skylights, of all the stupid ideas...

I did manage to secure a darker, comfortably quiet corner a few months ago, but a very noisy guy (-won't go into detail here), later decided to start sitting at the pod directly in front of mine... And I had moved there to get father away from him in the first place! <insert frantic screaming here>

On top of that, he wears the most disgusting cologne/body-spray/deodorant/whatever-the-hell-it-is that I've ever smelled in my life on a guy. It literally makes me feel sick, so I have to turn my fan around as soon as he comes in, trying to blow his stench back over the divider (-so much for cooling me down, as desperately needed). Nobody else seems to mind his "scent", of course - and he somehow hasn't noticed how I react when he's around, or is too much of a di*k to care. I'm afraid to ask him to move as he probably wouldn't take it in a subtle way, and he's got one of the loudest voices on the floor... Or worse, talking to him about it might lead me to explode into a scene, due to pent-up anger.

Out of all of the available seats, the one I have now would still be the perfect for me, if he'd only stayed where he was when I moved there! <more inner screams>

(Gee... Maybe this is what they call a "meltdown"?)

I'm just so sick of my ridiculous sensitivities. No wonder I hate leaving my apartment so much. It's the only place that I can really be comfortable and in control.
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post #154 of 173 (permalink) Old 06-02-2011, 08:14 PM
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I'm just so sick of my ridiculous sensitivities. No wonder I hate leaving my apartment so much. It's the only place that I can really be comfortable and in control.
I think I could get by with most of my sensitivities if I wasn't surrounded by people and the noises they make. It's as if my nervous system is still stuck in the Paleolithic state and wasn't evolved to deal with densely-packed human interaction/technology/noises/smells/sounds.
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post #155 of 173 (permalink) Old 06-03-2011, 12:29 PM
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It's as if my nervous system is still stuck in the Paleolithic state and wasn't evolved to deal with densely-packed human interaction/technology/noises/smells/sounds.
That does make sense. My reaction to triggers feels frighteningly "primitive", too... Senseless, out-of-control inner rage and/or panic.
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post #156 of 173 (permalink) Old 06-03-2011, 09:58 PM
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I really like this pdf. The Nesse references also discusses the evolutionary advantages for anxiety.


Abstract: This article reviews etiological and comparative evidence supporting the hypothesis that some genes associated with the autism spectrum were naturally selected and represent the adaptive benefits of being cognitively suited for solitary foraging. People on the autism spectrum are conceptualized here as ecologically competent individuals that could have been adept at learning and implementing hunting and gathering skills in the ancestral environment. Upon independence from their mothers, young individuals on the autism spectrum may have been psychologically predisposed toward a different life-history strategy, common among mammals and even some primates, to hunt and gather primarily on their own. Many of the behavioral and cognitive tendencies that autistic individuals exhibit are viewed here as adaptations that would have complemented a solitary lifestyle. For example, the obsessive, repetitive and systemizing tendencies in autism, which can be mistakenly applied toward activities such as block stacking today, may have been focused by hunger and thirst toward successful food procurement in the ancestral past. Both solitary mammals and autistic individuals are low on measures of gregariousness, socialization, direct gazing, eye contact, facial expression, facial recognition, emotional engagement, affiliative need and other social behaviors.

The evolution of the neurological tendencies in solitary species that predispose them toward being introverted and reclusive may hold important clues for the evolution of the autism spectrum and the natural selection of autism genes. Solitary animals are thought to eschew unnecessary social contact as part of a foraging strategy often due to scarcity and wide dispersal of food in their native environments. It is thought that the human ancestral environment was often nutritionally sparse as well, and this may have driven human parties to periodically disband. Inconsistencies in group size must have led to inconsistencies in the manner in which natural selection fashioned the social minds of humans, which in turn may well be responsible for the large variation in social abilities seen in human populations. This article emphasizes that individuals on the autism spectrum may have only been partially solitary, that natural selection may have only favored subclinical autistic traits and that the most severe cases of autism may be due to assortative mating.


http://www.epjournal.net/filestore/EP09207238.pdf
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post #157 of 173 (permalink) Old 06-04-2011, 12:54 AM
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I really like this pdf. The Nesse references also discusses the evolutionary advantages for anxiety.

http://www.epjournal.net/filestore/EP09207238.pdf

Very interesting read. I had to chuckle over: "Comparing non-autistic and autistic individuals then may be more like comparing a dog (a pack animal) to a cat (a largely solitary animal)..." Reminded me of how, as a child, I would sometimes follow my cat around on all fours as it prowled around in the yard - imitating his movements, right down to the rump-twitch before a pounce. Even taught myself to purr basically like a cat at one point, using the throat, but I lost that odd "ability" as I got older and figured I should stop practicing it. Looking back, these things must have seemed awfully strange to my family (and nosy neighbours), but it felt very natural for me to emulate cats. I love animals in general more than humans, but I've never really had an interest in/appreciation of dogs... Perhaps there's now an explanation for it (-other than being strongly disgusted by how they smell).
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post #158 of 173 (permalink) Old 06-04-2011, 07:56 AM
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Very interesting read. I had to chuckle over: "Comparing non-autistic and autistic individuals then may be more like comparing a dog (a pack animal) to a cat (a largely solitary animal)..." Reminded me of how, as a child, I would sometimes follow my cat around on all fours as it prowled around in the yard, imitating his movements, right down to the rump-twitch before a pounce. Even taught myself to purr basically like a cat at one point, using the throat, and proudly displayed it to my mother - but I lost that odd "ability" as I got older and figured I should stop practicing it.
Me too. I like imitating animals. I thought cats look the coolest/slickest. I like watching how they apporoach prey. In general, I prefer "loner" animals and "loner" people to social ones. For example, I was obsessed with Clint Eatwood's character when I was younger and Richard Tyson's character when I got older.

I preferred cats to dogs and tigers to lions because of that "loner" aspect. I've often found the whole concept of man being a social animal almost repulsive and see it as a weakness. I find extremely sociable people as kind of "sheepish"/weak. I know it's stupid. Having said that I also have SAD and it confuses me as to why I have it. Maybe SAD is a positive thing in introverts like ourselves because it prevents us from being too rude, impolite, arrogant, etc. and suffering the social punishments. I like this passage posted by another member:

"Feeling anxious in social situations serves to remind each of us to pay attention to the effects our behavior have on those around us. If we didn't think about the effects of our behavior on others, we would probably get into trouble more often than not. We wouldn't bother dressing nicely or being polite. We might always say exactly what's on our mind, without considering whether it might be hurtful. Feeling anxious in social situations protects us from offending other people and from having other people judge us in negative ways. In fact, many of us find the qualities associated with mild shyness (e.g., modesty, a lack of pushiness) to be attractive. It is normal and often helpful to feel shy or socially anxious from time to time."
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post #159 of 173 (permalink) Old 06-05-2011, 02:07 PM
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I was told I may have Asperger's Syndrome. The only criteria that really don't fit for me are not understanding non-verbal cues, because I do understand them and being content to be alone. I am not content to be alone, I just feel like people will reject me. Other than that, I guess I do fit many of the characteristics.
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post #160 of 173 (permalink) Old 06-05-2011, 02:43 PM
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SA + ADHD can mimic mild ASD, so if you don't have all of these sensory problems that people are going on about, it might be worth reconsidering.

I had the ASD ("features of Asperger's" because I was lacking some symptoms) label forced on me as a child because my outward behaviour (holding myself back socially because of the SA, and inattention/hyperactivity from the ADHD), and it completely destroyed my childhood and education. None of the behavioural support they gave me was of any benefit, and I could never identify with people who actually had the condition.

It wasn't until I discovered SA that I realised why I was so socially awkward (I never identified the feelings that caused me to behave like that as anxiety before), and it wasn't until I realised that there was more to ADHD than kids climbing all over the furniture and running around in circles that I realised why my organisation, listening skills, concentration and frustration threshold were so poor.

Just something to consider for SAers looking into Asperger's.
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