Asperger's Syndrome? - Page 6 - Social Anxiety Forum
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post #101 of 173 (permalink) Old 01-27-2011, 11:14 AM
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Here's mine. I get similar scores, give or take. I'm guessing many introverts will get similar scores?


Thank you for filling out this questionnaire.

Your Aspie score: 159 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 39 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie


'hows that similar to mine???
btw i cant read the graphs lol thats how badly retarded i am
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post #102 of 173 (permalink) Old 01-27-2011, 11:41 AM
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Your Aspie score: 110 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 98 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits


Hmm Ok.
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post #103 of 173 (permalink) Old 01-29-2011, 10:55 PM
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Your Aspie score: 138 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 78 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

Not surprised.

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post #104 of 173 (permalink) Old 01-29-2011, 11:16 PM
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Your Aspie score: 56 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 147 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical

Funny, I was absolutely convinced I was an Aspie for a few months. But that was purely OCD obsessing.
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post #105 of 173 (permalink) Old 01-30-2011, 05:55 AM
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'hows that similar to mine???
btw i cant read the graphs lol thats how badly retarded i am
You were diagnosed with AS and yet this test gave you a lower Aspie score. That seems to suggest that this test may not always be a good diagnostic test for AS. Personally, I would have thought this test and the other one are really good tests for measuring introversion, more than anything else? I'm an introvert and score very high on both.
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post #106 of 173 (permalink) Old 01-30-2011, 10:23 AM
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You were diagnosed with AS and yet this test gave you a lower Aspie score. That seems to suggest that this test may not always be a good diagnostic test for AS. Personally, I would have thought this test and the other one are really good tests for measuring introversion, more than anything else? I'm an introvert and score very high on both.
No. Introversion itself has little, if anything, to do with social adeptness, pragmatics, or one's interactions with the world. These are better explained by a developmental disorder such as Asperger's, which is what this test actually measures. Introverts can be extremely cunning, manipulative, socially adept, and apparently "normal." Aspies and autists, however, are generally none of these. Most personality disordered people are, in fact, introverts, and these are some of the most manipulative and, superficially, socially adept people.
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post #107 of 173 (permalink) Old 01-30-2011, 12:14 PM
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You may be right but if you look over at the questions in those Aspie tests and the wiki definition of introversion, there seems to be some overlap:

Introversion is "the state of or tendency toward being wholly or predominantly concerned with and interested in one's own mental life". Introverts are people whose energy tends to expand through reflection and dwindle during interaction. Introverts tend to be more reserved and less outspoken in large groups. They often take pleasure in solitary activities such as reading, writing, music, drawing, tinkering, playing video games, watching movies and plays, and using computers, along with some more reserved outdoor activities such as fishing and hiking. In fact, social networking sites have been a thriving home for introverts in the 21st century, where introverts are free from the formalities of social conduct and may become more comfortable blogging about personal feelings they would not otherwise disclose. The archetypal artist, writer, sculptor, engineer, composer, and inventor are all highly introverted. An introvert is likely to enjoy time spent alone and find less reward in time spent with large groups of people, though he or she may better enjoy interactions with a small group of close friends. Trust is usually an issue of significance—a virtue of utmost importance—to an introvert choosing a worthy companion. They prefer to concentrate on a single activity at a time and like to observe situations before they participate, especially observed in developing children and adolescents.Introverts are easily overwhelmed by too much stimulation from social gatherings and engagement. They are more analytical before speaking.
Introversion is not necessarily the same as shyness or the social outcast. Introverts choose solitary over social activities by preference. Whereas shy people—who may be extroverts at heart—avoid social encounters out of fearand the social “outcast” not by choice, but because no one will invite them to social activities or befriend them so that they can be social.

Here's a paper discussing this possible link between introversion and Autism:

http://etd.fcla.edu/CF/CFE0003090/Gr..._201005_MA.pdf

What do you guys think?
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post #108 of 173 (permalink) Old 01-30-2011, 12:34 PM
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@bmwfan07. It's pertinent to think in terms of spectrum traits here, so while introverts may have social skills defined within neurotypicality (that is, nonautistic) it doesn't mean they're in general as socially adept as nonintroverts on the same measures. For instance modern measures of introversion include items that indicate social unease, issues with prosody, social withdrawal, absorption in solitary interests, finding socialising difficult and taxing, blanking out in social situations and preference for narrow interests. These are abundant in Aspie Quiz (and also the AQ). (By the way Aspie Quiz is not specific to Asperger's, by its developer's admission - he says it measures neurodiversity - and has not been validated using clinical samples.)

In the literature there are studies showing the majority with high functioning ASDs have at least one personality disorder. Are you considering any PD in particular?

Many with Asperger's are "apparently normal" and that can cause problems - the term doesn't mean much. For instance many introverts are not deemed normal and there's discrimination against them as a group. Introversion isn't unitary and there may be subgroups based on the various factors comprising conceptualisations of introversion (such as in social attributes, cognition and activity). As mentioned in the above link the different possible balances of each factor within the introversion category may be correlated with particular psychiatric diagnoses.
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post #109 of 173 (permalink) Old 01-30-2011, 07:30 PM
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My score on AQ Test is 42, and on Aspie Test I performed:
Your Aspie score: 168 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 34 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

I am always pretty high on these tests. I have a diagnosis of Asperger's tho.
The difference between social phobia and AS, since I have experience with both, is that when you have only Social Phobia, you think you can't communicate out of fear, you fear situations, you are seen as having low social skills because of the anxiety. You then are able to communicate, can understand body language, voice tone, subtle communication cues, but are unable to respond because of fear or make mistake then.

When you have Asperger's it is different. Then it is like you don't have the skills needed from when really young, but do not fear the communication. Just can't respond because you do not understand it and basically don't know how to respond even when you're trying to learn it so hard. Get it?

Indeed people can have both, like I do, and in me it is reason the bullying, criticizing and judgments placed on me because of the low social skills I have because I have Asperger's. I also didn't fear situations when really young, until some later grade of primary, but I never could really make friends, nor was I interested to. In first grades I wasn't, I was like in my own world, but later I wanted, but couldn't. And later I began to fear the communication because it didn't 'click' in my head on how to do it.
When you don't know the thing, you come to fear it after time, especially if everyone is telling you there's something wrong with you because you can't.

When there's only SP with no AS, it is not like that. You know how to communicate, but fear it because of bullying or any other reason. Or you can be shy and can then fear it as well. Also lack of experience etc. But not as with AS.

AS itself does not include just communication and socializing. It includes also the need for order, inflexibility, repetitiveness, sensory sensitivity, literal thinking, trouble understanding non-verbal communication...
I have these, this is not an easy life, I am mild to moderate on AS spectrum. And I know what AS means really well. Actually I hate what's going on with all the self-diagnosis and all, because it is a serious thing, at least for me. Because I know what I am going through. And have a professional diagnosis, also been told by some other people who work with me or know me well.
It is a thing that is seen, not so hidden. If you want, you will clearly see. Even in person that doesn't have a diagnosis. He might just seem weird, creepy, but you'll know something is definitely going on by the weird and troubled behavior.

If you think you have Asperger's, go see a professional and talk about that matter.
And people, don't try to diagnose yourself by self-tests, you could likely be wrong. Better to learn about what the thing really is (not just the criteria) and try to talk to someone familiar with it about that, the best it would be if an autism spectrum specialist, because they pick it up almost immediately when they see you perform and talk with you even a bit, and are most times accurate.

Anyway, why is here aon the nets a whole so much confusion going on about these kind of disorders, or how else you'd like to call them, like AvPD, AS, being an introvert, shyness, social phobia... because if you look at it as a whole, you see that all of these are quite different things, although some symptoms may overlap.
I could also find myself in a whole bunch of different disorders, but... when you then look closer, you just come to say 'ehh, that's not me at all', because the whole picture of the disorder does not apply to you at all, but you could match the whole criteria, just for a bit different reason or because some symptom written can have double meaning, and you likely saw it just from your own view and no what's the real reason for or if it is not just similar thing to what you have or you didn't know anything about how it is to have the disorder, development and all.

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post #110 of 173 (permalink) Old 01-30-2011, 07:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Kon View Post
You may be right but if you look over at the questions in those Aspie tests and the wiki definition of introversion, there seems to be some overlap:

Introversion is "the state of or tendency toward being wholly or predominantly concerned with and interested in one's own mental life". Introverts are people whose energy tends to expand through reflection and dwindle during interaction. Introverts tend to be more reserved and less outspoken in large groups. They often take pleasure in solitary activities such as reading, writing, music, drawing, tinkering, playing video games, watching movies and plays, and using computers, along with some more reserved outdoor activities such as fishing and hiking. In fact, social networking sites have been a thriving home for introverts in the 21st century, where introverts are free from the formalities of social conduct and may become more comfortable blogging about personal feelings they would not otherwise disclose. The archetypal artist, writer, sculptor, engineer, composer, and inventor are all highly introverted. An introvert is likely to enjoy time spent alone and find less reward in time spent with large groups of people, though he or she may better enjoy interactions with a small group of close friends. Trust is usually an issue of significance—a virtue of utmost importance—to an introvert choosing a worthy companion. They prefer to concentrate on a single activity at a time and like to observe situations before they participate, especially observed in developing children and adolescents.Introverts are easily overwhelmed by too much stimulation from social gatherings and engagement. They are more analytical before speaking.
Introversion is not necessarily the same as shyness or the social outcast. Introverts choose solitary over social activities by preference. Whereas shy people—who may be extroverts at heart—avoid social encounters out of fearand the social “outcast” not by choice, but because no one will invite them to social activities or befriend them so that they can be social.

Here's a paper discussing this possible link between introversion and Autism:

http://etd.fcla.edu/CF/CFE0003090/Gr..._201005_MA.pdf

What do you guys think?
You can't possibly expect an ADHDer like me to read what appears to be a thesis of some sort.

Quote:
Originally Posted by odd_one_out View Post
@bmwfan07. It's pertinent to think in terms of spectrum traits here, so while introverts may have social skills defined within neurotypicality (i.e. non-autistic), it does not mean they are in general as socially adept as non-introverts on the same measures. For example, modern measures of introversion include items that indicate social unease, issues with prosody, social withdrawal, absorption in solitary interests, finding socialising difficult and taxing, blanking out in social situations, and preference for narrow interests. These are abundant in Aspie Quiz (and also the AQ). (By the way, Aspie Quiz is not specific to AS, by its developer's admission - he says it measures "neurodiversity" - and has not been validated using clinical samples.)
What studies or research has indicated that introversion is associated with "social unease, issues with prosody, finding socializing difficult and taxing, and blanking out in social situations?" "Social withdrawal" and "solitary interests" are a bit ambiguous, as there are many introverts who are quite heavily involved in and love certain aspects of dealing with the public, managing huge companies, giving lectures and speeches, and otherwise involving themselves in "non-solitary" interests with active social engagement. Yes, they may need to "recharge" afterward by themselves by reading, jogging, working on a solitary project, etc. And I believe that by itself is the most sensitive indicator of introversion, but not necessarily all the other questionable traits that you somewhat arbitrarily ascribed to introversion.

Also, it's worth noting that many "extroverts," including me, have mental disorders, including ones that hamper social interaction--among them social phobia, ADHD, and avoidant PD (yes, avoidants can be extroverts, in the colloquial sense of the word).

So, while I agree that introversion-extroversion traits exist on a spectrum, I believe they are entirely separate and apart from mental disorders that seem to correlate with or imply certain indicators of introversion vs. extroversion, as these personality types are likely the result of or adaptations to a developmental disorder, particularly in the case of ASDs, and not the cause. It's actually a bit of a red herring.

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In the literature, there are studies showing the majority with high functioning ASDs have at least one personality disorder. Are you considering any PD in particular?
I'm not sure whom you're asking, but I would bet that schizoid PD is one of the more common PDs in people with ASDs. Still, I believe this extra diagnosis is largely unnecessary; I believe the ASD can explain most of these tendencies and does not require the potentially harmful assertion that, in addition to these already painful disorders, one has a "disordered" personality. No one has anything to gain from this type of diagnosis, except the overzealous practitioner feeling a sense of accomplishment.

Quote:
Many with AS are "apparently normal", and that can often cause problems; the term does not mean much - for example, many introverts are not deemed normal and there's discrimination against them as a group. Introversion is not unitary and there may be subgroups based on the various factors comprising conceptualisations of introversion (e.g. in social attributes, cognition, and activity). As mentioned in the above link, the different possible balances of each factor within the introversion category may be correlated with particular psychiatric diagnoses.
I would agree that there is definitely a bit of a stigma regarding introversion. But, again, that doesn't imply anything for mental disorders, which again, exist separately from introversion or extroversion, as measures of personality.
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post #111 of 173 (permalink) Old 01-30-2011, 08:40 PM
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Aaaand 34 on the AQ.

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post #112 of 173 (permalink) Old 01-31-2011, 12:05 PM
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I have a therapist that I see most weeks, Should I tell her. If I should tell her can someone please tell me too say too her o.O

Cheers
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post #113 of 173 (permalink) Old 01-31-2011, 08:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anasthasiya View Post
The difference between social phobia and AS, since I have experience with both, is that when you have only Social Phobia, you think you can't communicate out of fear, you fear situations, you are seen as having low social skills because of the anxiety. You then are able to communicate, can understand body language, voice tone, subtle communication cues, but are unable to respond because of fear or make mistake then.

When you have Asperger's it is different. Then it is like you don't have the skills needed from when really young, but do not fear the communication. Just can't respond because you do not understand it and basically don't know how to respond even when you're trying to learn it so hard. Get it?
This is the part I don't understand and confuses me. With Asperger's what is the reason for not understanding social stuff? When you look closely at it, here's one possibility that seems to blur the difference between the social anxiety seen in AS, Social Anxiety Disorder and HSP:

"The lack of social interaction in autism may therefore not be because of deficits in the ability to process social and emotional cues, but because a sub-set of cues are overly intense, compulsively attended to, excessively processed and remembered with frightening clarity and intensity. Typical autistic symptoms, such as averted eye gaze, social withdrawal, and lack of communication, may be explained by an initial over-awareness of sensory and social fragments of the environment, which may be so intense, that avoidance is the only refuge."

This part seems to describe my own problems with social interaction very well. I don't particularly feel like I'm going to be humiliated but that I will mess up because there are so many things to be considered in any social interaction. I feel overwhelmed and I can't think quickly enough and I'm not sure what to say. I do this even with friends. But unlike some descriptions on Aspie forums, I kinda think I understand social interactions but I don't know which is the right decision to make and why I have to do it. Most people seem to be able to weed out stuff and make much more quicker social decisions. I'm not sure if I'm making any sense? Either way I don't think the differentiation is as clear as it might first appear, especially for introverted SADers, I think. Just my opinion.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti...m-04-00224.pdf
http://neuroskeptic.blogspot.com/201...of-autism.html
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post #114 of 173 (permalink) Old 02-01-2011, 07:58 PM
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I got a 32 on some test I took. Which is high...

My family thinks I have it and now I'm starting to realize it. Ever since I was little I would rock back and forth all the time. I wouldn't talk and I'd have anger problems. I also use to align my dinosaurs all perfect from color to size...and i would solve hard puzzles easily and stack things at a very young age.

I still catch myself rocking back and forth if I'm thinking really hard or if I'm trying to calm down. I also lack empathy...and I HATE loud noises!!!

...
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post #115 of 173 (permalink) Old 02-01-2011, 10:09 PM
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It dont mean you have Asperger's Kris. you may just have social phobia , and symptoms of Asperger's. Right away they want to put labels on people
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post #116 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-11-2011, 04:01 AM
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I got:
134 out of 200 (aspie score)
62 out of 200 (Neutrotypical score)

And 34 on the Cambridge test

But I also got 'very severe' social anxiety on that test, so I'm confused...

Do I have both? Or just one?

:S
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post #117 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-12-2011, 04:52 AM
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People need to not get confused with having SA/being shy to having Aspergers. I'm paying out of my pocket to go have a professional Asperger evaluation tomorrow. It's not just having social issues, don't forget the sensory issues and everything else. Sensitive to sound, light, etc, meltdowns, getting overwhelmed easily blah blah narrow special interests etc.

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post #118 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-12-2011, 01:52 PM
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From the Aspie Quiz: www.rdos.net/eng
Your Aspie score: 136 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 72 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie




The Broad Autism Phenotype Test
http://www.okcupid.com/tests/the-bro...phenotype-test
This questionnairre is designed to measure the mild autistic traits present in people who are not actually autistic but have a genetic predisposition to autism.

Autistic/BAP
You scored 117 aloof, 82 rigid and 99 pragmatic
You scored above the cutoff on all three scales. Clearly, you are either autistic or on the broader autistic phenotype. You probably are not very social, and when you do interact with others, you come off as strange or rude without meaning to. You probably also like things to be familiar and predictable and don't like changes, especially unexpected ones.

You scored 117% on aloof, higher than 73% of your peers.
You scored 82% on rigid, higher than 29% of your peers.
You scored 99% on pragmatic, higher than 68% of your peers.
You scored 3% on diagnosis, higher than 26% of your peers.

I don't know that I agree with the rigid score, I don't think of myself as rigid. The rest of it is probably correct though.


From Spectrum Quotient (AQ) test (Baron-Cohen et al., 2001).
www.wired.com/wired/archive/9.12/aqtest.html

Agree: 4,5,6,7,12,13,22,23,26,33,39,41,43,45,46: 1 point
Disagree: 1,3,8,10,11,14,15,17,24,25,28,30,32,37,38,44,47,48 : 1 point
Score: 33


From: Empathizing Quotient and Systemizing Quotient - Revised (EQ SQ-R) tests (Wheelwright et al., 2006).
http://eqsq.com/eq-sq-tests/
Respondent Average EQ Average SQ Brain Type
Males ............ 39.0 ....... 61.2 ..... Systemizing
Females ......... 48.0 ........51.7 ..... Empathizing
Your Score ..... 33 .......... 61 ....... Extreme Systemizing


I think I empathize with people, I just don't express it the same way as most women. I agree that I am more Systemizing though. Which is why I don't really relate to so many women, I guess.


6. Understanding facial expression test: The 'Reading the mind in the eyes' test (Baron-Cohen et al.). Average score is between 22 and 30.
If you have ASD, you might have difficulties understanding facial expression.
http://glennrowe.net/BaronCohen/Faces/EyesTest.aspx
Your score: 30
A typical score is in the range 22-30. If you scored over 30, you are very accurate at decoding a person's facial expressions around their eyes. A score under 22 indicates you find this quite difficult.

The correct answers for the ones you missed are:
2: upset
4: insisting
14: accusing
17: doubtful
18: decisive
23: defiant


I did better on the "Understanding Facial Expression Test" than I thought I would. So that means, when I suspect someone is bored or angry or impatient...I could be right. Doesn't make me feel better.


7. Face blindness / Prosopagnosia test: The Cambridge Face Memory test (faceblind.org).
http://www.faceblind.org/facetests/

Out of 30 faces, you correctly identified 28.
You were familiar with 30 of the people in this test.
If we exclude the ones you were unfamiliar with, you got 93% correct.


I was diagnosed with severe social anxiety and depression at age 29 or 30. If I can ever afford to see a therapist again I'll bring up these scores and ask their opinion, I guess.
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post #119 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-12-2011, 03:17 PM
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I find it difficult to judge the right emotional response I should give to a general situation. I often find people silently judging me because I'm acting a little odd, yet I can't figure out why. One thing I have noticed is that I often start talking too soon, before the other person have finished and I don't even realise it. I often find it difficult knowing when the right time is to speak. When it's pointed out to me I get sad and angry with myself, I don't mean to be rude at all.

Don't judge me because I'm a quiet person.
Nobody plans a murder out loud
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post #120 of 173 (permalink) Old 05-12-2011, 03:50 PM
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I can't take the face recognition one (faceblind) because I was sheltered from the media... literally did not have a TV or radio in my house, never saw movies, never was allowed to listen to any music other than classical or hymns... so yeah I don't know culture!
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