Asperger's Syndrome? - Page 2 - Social Anxiety Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #21 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-19-2009, 08:12 PM
SAS Member
 
antonina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Bay Area, CA
Gender: Female
Posts: 323

people with autism do want friends


Quote:
Originally Posted by meyaj View Post
There is generally a key difference between people with SA and people with Asperger's. People with SA tend to desire social contact but, obviously, feel really anxious about it. Social phobics want to treat their problem because they don't really like the isolation they're enduring.

Aspies, on the other hand, tend to prefer the isolation. Half the time they aren't even really socially anxious... they can be very outgoing and talk your ear off about something that happens to interest them. They just have a hard time realizing when nobody cares.

So I guess the major question is... are you on a board dealing with social anxiety because social interaction is something you genuinely want, or does it only matter to you insofar as it gives you a sense of normalcy?
I had to address this quote as I am a special education teacher and work with students who are diagnosed with autism. These students DO WANT TO HAVE FRIENDS. They just can't understand why people are upset with them. I think dealing with bullying and rejection probably has turned adults with autism and asperger's off to attempting social interactions because they can go so wrong. People need to try to develop more awareness. I have noticed when I work with these kids I need to spell everything out literally. I tell them that what they are saying is hurting someone's feelings. I then explain why. I notice that they didn't mean to do this and they don't want the person to be mad at them. They just don't have social awareness. They need people to be literal and direct with them.
antonina is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-19-2009, 08:18 PM
SAS Member
 
antonina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Bay Area, CA
Gender: Female
Posts: 323

Don't feel bad about it


Quote:
Originally Posted by britisharrow View Post
I was diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome about three weeks ago, this has forced me to reconsider my objectives when it comes to social anxiety. As there is no treatment to make someone 'not autistic' or 'neurotypical' my therapists have agreed with me that a more realistic goal is for me to accept who I am as an autistic person.

Some people here may suffer from autism and be undiagnosed, however it is likely that the majority suffer from social anxiety and are not autistic. Impaired social ability is a major component of Aspergers, but there are other symptoms and characteristics with which some people here will not identify.

If you feel you have Aspergers then you could mention it to your doctor, however it is not something to be wanting, because basically what it means for me is that I will always have this alienating feeling regardless of drugs or therapy. The most I can do is come to accept that and to accept myself for who I am.
You sound pretty down about it but it doesn't have to be a terrible thing.
There are some pretty talented people with asperger's: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...utism_spectrum

You can still do many things. Asperger's also can give you some gifts like a super focus. Also many computer programmers have it.

You are right about learning to accept yourself though.
antonina is offline  
post #23 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-19-2009, 08:20 PM
3rd SAS Battalion
 
britisharrow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Glasgow, UK
Gender: Male
Age: 34
Posts: 885
Quote:
Originally Posted by antonina View Post
You sound pretty down about it but it doesn't have to be a terrible thing.
There are some pretty talented people with asperger's: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...utism_spectrum

You can still do many things. Asperger's also can give you some gifts like a super focus. Also many computer programmers have it.

You are right about learning to accept yourself though.
Your absolutely right, it is something that can be managed and there are many successful people who are autistic. Thanks for the link to that list.
britisharrow is offline  
 
post #24 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-19-2009, 10:52 PM
Yes
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Greater Toronto Area
Gender: Male
Age: 33
Posts: 1,760
Quote:
Originally Posted by antonina View Post
I had to address this quote as I am a special education teacher and work with students who are diagnosed with autism. These students DO WANT TO HAVE FRIENDS. They just can't understand why people are upset with them. I think dealing with bullying and rejection probably has turned adults with autism and asperger's off to attempting social interactions because they can go so wrong. People need to try to develop more awareness. I have noticed when I work with these kids I need to spell everything out literally. I tell them that what they are saying is hurting someone's feelings. I then explain why. I notice that they didn't mean to do this and they don't want the person to be mad at them. They just don't have social awareness. They need people to be literal and direct with them.
Sorry if I was spreading misinformation. I have 2 cousins with the disorder, and have talked about it a lot with my psychiatrist and a pediatric psychiatrist, and that was my impression of it. I think one key difference though is that a lot of people with SA are almost hyper-tuned into the emotions of people. Would you agree?

I don't find myself having a hard time putting myself in other peoples' shoes at all. If anything, I've always seemed to have a much higher degree of empathy than my peers. My understanding is that people on the autism spectrum have a great deal of trouble with this.

I'm sure as a special ed teacher you're familiar with Simon Baron-Cohen's "Sally-Anne" theory of mind test. One thing I'm really not clear on is until what age this typically works on a person with Asperger's. I would imagine an adult has usually figured out the whole theory of mind thing by then, even if they don't intrinsically "get" it.
meyaj is offline  
post #25 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-20-2009, 06:38 AM
herp derp
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 2,347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duke of Prunes View Post
Your Aspie score: 57 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 137 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical


Could someone help explain to me that graph/results please?
What does it mean, "neurotypical talent" and "aspie talent" or "aspie activity pattern" and "neurotypical social"? And what is it talking about when it says "hunting"?
Banzai is offline  
post #26 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-20-2009, 07:08 AM
Your Assumptions
 
odd_one_out's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 7,027
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banzai View Post
Could someone help explain to me that graph/results please?
What does it mean, "neurotypical talent" and "aspie talent" or "aspie activity pattern" and "neurotypical social"? And what is it talking about when it says "hunting"?
Here's a summary the quiz designer wrote for each (sorry it's long and for the latest version),


"Aspie talent": This group contains intellectually related Aspie traits. Typical traits are related to interests (e.g. having strong interests; hyper focusing; having periods of contemplation; collecting
information; good long term memory related to interests; figuring out how things work; making connections between things; strong-willed; stubborn). Other traits are related to information
processing (e.g. noticing details; finding patterns; unusual imagination; solving problems in unusual ways; unique ideas). Some people have special talents (e.g. numbers; language;
computers; music).

"Neurotypical talent": This group contains neurotypical intellectual talents. Often these are defined in terms of Aspie disabilities. Typical traits seem to be adaptations to cooperative living (e.g. giving and
remembering verbal instructions; learning from others; describing events; summarizing events; taking notes; keeping track of several conversations; learning things on demand; learning by
imitation). Other traits include multitasking and attention (e.g. doing several things at the same time; rapidly shifting focus; getting back to things quickly), getting a quick picture of one’s
environment (e.g. generalizing; getting the overall picture), remembering where things are, grasping abstract concepts and organizing daily life.

"Aspie Compulsion": This group contains obsessive and compulsive Aspie traits. Typical of this group is a preference for sameness (e.g. routines; lists; schedules; sitting on the same seat; going to the same shop;
wearing the same clothes; eating the same food; always doing things in the same way). Related traits include getting frustrated when interrupted and a need to prepare oneself before doing
new things. Some people have strong attachments to objects and like to collect and organize things and may need precision or symmetry.

"Neurotypical compulsion": This group contains socially related compulsive traits. Key traits are to enjoy social interaction (e.g. meeting people; involving others; games; crowds; large social networks; hosting events;
being a leader; gossip; cheering). Other traits are related to social conformity (e.g. having views typical of peer group; preferring to socialize with others of the same age and gender; interest
for fashions; wearing jewellery; wearing makeup; taking pride in ones appearance, style, image and identity; status seeking; climbing hierarchies).

"Aspie social": This group contain Aspie social traits. Important traits are a highly variable activity level with higher than normal motivation threshold. Other traits include atypical relationship & courtship
preferences (partner obsessions; not giving up on relationships; preference for friends of the opposite gender) and sexual preferences. Unusual eating and sleeping patterns as well as having a
hard time with authorities and social hierarchy are other traits.

"Neurotypical social": This group contains neurotypical social traits. The absence of the traits is often described as a dysfunction. Key traits are adaptations for living in changing social groups (e.g. smalltalk;
social chitchat; shaking hands; saying ‘hi’, ‘thank you’ and ‘sorry’). Related traits are adaptations for socializing with strangers (e.g. being comfortable with strangers; enjoying talking
face-to-face with strangers; maintaining large social networks; easy to get to know; talking in public; enjoying uninvited guests). Other traits are related to friendships and relationships and
expressing feelings in typical ways (e.g. making and maintaining friendships and relationships; looking at people you talk to; enjoying hugs and touch; being emotionally close to others;
describing and talking about feelings) and cooperative activities (e.g. team-sports; group endeavours; teamwork; using others expertise; working while being observed).

"Aspie communication": This group contains communication related Aspie traits. Key traits in this group are related to atypical nonverbal communication (e.g. odd facial expressions; odd posture; odd prosody;
smiling at the wrong occasion; being accused of staring; using unusual sounds in conversations; blinking or rolling eyes; clenching fists; grinding teeth; thrusting tongue; blushing). Related
traits are stims (e.g. wringing hands; rubbing hands; twirling fingers; rocking; tapping eyes; pressing eyes; fiddling with things; pacing; flapping hands; biting self or others; chewing on
things; picking scabs; peeling skin flakes; examining hair of others; singing). Tics are also here and are often confused with stims (e.g. stuttering; sniffing; snorting; coughing; echolalia;
echopraxia). Other traits include general communication differences (e.g. not verbalizing thoughts; talking softly or loudly; turning words around; talking to oneself; odd pronunciation; not
separating ‘I’, ‘we’ and ‘you’). Some people also prefer to look a lot at people they like and not at all at people they dislike.

"Neurotypical communication": This group contains typical nonverbal communication traits. A key trait is the ability to interpret and show typical nonverbal communication (e.g. facial expressions; body language;
courtship; timing; reciprocity; turn-taking; prosody). The absence of these abilities lead to secondary problems (e.g. unaware of how to behave; unaware of boundaries; being misunderstood;
missing hidden agendas; being unaware of others intentions; misinterpreting figures of speech, idioms and allegories; literal interpretation; unable to return social gestures and courtesies: not
knowing when to apologize; saying inappropriate things; seemingly poor empathy).

"Aspie hunting": This group contains passive hunting traits. One part of the traits is related to preferred habitats (e.g. slowly flowing water; caves; woods; liking mist or fog). Another part seems to be
close-contact hunting traits (e.g. jumping over things; climbing; chasing animals; biting; enjoying spinning in circles; strong grip; strong hands; physical endurance; enjoying rodeo riders).
Some other traits are related to sneaking (e.g. sneaking through the woods; sneaking up on animals; walking on toes) and general hunting tactics (e.g. mimicking animal sounds; digging;
throwing small things; building traps; fascination for fire; sniffing)

"Neurotypical hunting": The traits in this group are related to cooperative hunting. These traits are often described in terms of dysfunctions. Typical traits are recollections of environmental information (e.g.
positions of things; scores in games; order of words, letters and digits; map reading) and passing on information to others (e.g. passing on messages; knowing left from right; dates and times
of events; remembering appointments and events; reading clocks and calendars; carrying over information between contexts). Other traits are related to trading and exchange with others (e.g.
calculating change from a purchase; knowing what to bring to appointments; remembering sequences of past events; remembering formulas; filling out forms).

"Aspie perception": This group contains perception-related Aspie traits. These traits commonly become disabilities, but their core seems to be more sensitive senses (e.g. touch; sound; tactile; smell; taste; light
and glare; humidity; changes in air pressure; wind; heat; electromagnetic fields) or less sensitive senses (e.g. pain). Related to this are instinctual reactions to sensory information (e.g. being
distracted by sounds; being afraid of motor-bikes; being afraid of floods or fast running streams; disliking stomping). Other traits are difficulty filtering out speech from background noise
and using peripheral vision.

"Neurotypical perception": This group contains neurotypical motor abilities and perception traits. The absence of these traits is often referred to as clumsiness. A key trait is the ability to interpret spatial information
(e.g. judging distance, speed and acceleration; keeping track of positions of objects; predicting motion; concept of time; optimal pressure to apply). The absence of these skills leads to
secondary problems (e.g. poor fine and gross motor skills; poor body awareness; poor body control; problems with ball sports; poor hand-eye coordination; poor balance; poor handwriting;
dropping things).
odd_one_out is offline  
post #27 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-20-2009, 07:16 AM
herp derp
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 2,347
^ thanks for that.
For the "aspie talent" and the "neurotypical talent", the first time I did the quiz, I scored 8.4 and 1.1 (above average, below average) and was extremely disappoointed but after reading that, it's not so bad after all
Banzai is offline  
post #28 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-20-2009, 08:16 AM
Après moi, le déluge
 
Kelly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 5,682
28 out of 200.



Have a nice day,
Kelly

Carefully, but full of might.
Kelly is offline  
post #29 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-20-2009, 08:49 AM
SAS Member
 
quietgal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: New Jersey
Gender: Female
Age: 32
Posts: 889
Your Aspie score: 100 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 98 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits




I guess I'm in the middle? It doesn't surprise me...

A cynic is a man who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing. - Oscar Wilde
quietgal is offline  
post #30 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-20-2009, 11:50 AM
SAS Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 73
,
locsaf is offline  
post #31 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-20-2009, 03:12 PM
SAS Member
 
Fuzzy Logic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: United Kingdom, Northern Ireland
Gender: Male
Age: 32
Posts: 654
126 out of 100 - Very likely, apparently.

Hmm, I am was going to book an appointment with my GP regarding my anxiety and if there are any drugs/treatments he can perscribe. I may take the oppertunity to ask him about this as well.

Personally I don't feel obliged to seriously consider these kind of things based off such a questionaire. The questions themselves lead you into making a positive diagnosis because they make you dredge up any particular instance in which you seemed to behave as they describe.

It so happens that my mother suggested I might suffer from this condition, but I have never been convinced. For one thing, my problem seems to be that I read too much into social situations rather than me not being able to read them. Hardly the sort of behaviour you would expect of someone who is supposed to be autistic.
Fuzzy Logic is offline  
post #32 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-21-2009, 03:06 AM
Your Assumptions
 
odd_one_out's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 7,027
^ There are many abstracts to access. Here are a couple showing SAD has some association with subtle difficulties reading facial expressions and intentions.


Recognition of Facial Affect by Children and Adolescents Diagnosed with Social Phobia (2001)
Susan J. Simonian , Deborah C. Beidel, Samuel M. Turner, Jennifer L. Berkes and Jonathan H. Long

Abstract This study compared the ability of children with social phobia and children with no psychiatric disorder to accurately judge facial affect. Fifteen children and adolescents with social phobia and 14 control children were asked to identify emotions depicted in slides from the Pictures of Facial Affect. In addition, they rated their level of anxiety on a pictorial Likert scale prior to and upon completion of the facial recognition task. The results indicated that children with social phobia had significantly poorer facial affect recognition skills than normal controls and reported greater anxiety upon completion of the recognition task. Multivariate analysis revealed significant differences between groups in the number of errors based on the type of facial affect. Post-hoc analysis indicated that deficits were most pronounced for facial representations of happiness, sadness, and disgust. The results are discussed in relation to an integrated model of social skills training that includes facial affect recognition training as a integral component in treatment programs for children and adolescents with social phobia. Directions for future research with larger samples of more ethnically diverse children and adolescents are presented.


Social-Cognitive Factors in Childhood Social Anxiety: A Preliminary Investigation (2001)

Robin Banerjee &
Lynne Henderson

The present study addresses the social cognition of socially anxious children, with particular emphasis on their ability to understand others' mental states in interpersonal situations. The heterogeneous sample used in this preliminary investigation consisted of 63 primary school children in England and the USA. The English children were from a mainstream classroom of 8- to 9-year-olds, while the children from the USA ranged in age from 6 to 11 years and had been selected by school district officials for a variety of social interaction difficulties. All children completed measures of social anxiety, shy negative affect, and various social-cognitive abilities, and teacher ratings of social skills were additionally available for the USA subgroup. Results showed that feelings of social anxiety are not associated with any basic deficit in the understanding of recursive mental states which concern facts about the physical world. However, there was evidence that socially anxious children—particularly those with high levels of shy negative affect—do experience specific social-cognitive difficulties in understanding the links between emotions, intentions, and beliefs in social situations. Providing further support for this link, socially anxious children were rated by their teachers as poorer than non-anxious children only on social skills that require insight into others' mental states. Directions for further examination of this complex interplay between cognitive and emotional factors in the development of social anxiety are discussed.
odd_one_out is offline  
post #33 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-22-2009, 03:14 AM
SAS Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 439
Your Aspie score: 139 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 71 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie



I don't know if this is right, I may have answered a few questions incorrectly.
Jurexic5 is offline  
post #34 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-28-2009, 06:11 PM
Yes
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Greater Toronto Area
Gender: Male
Age: 33
Posts: 1,760
Just thought I'd add this, if it helps at all.

My psychiatrist referred me to a pediatric psychiatrist for a consult. We felt that Asperger's was very unlikely but he gave me an assessment scale to give to my parents to fill out based on when I was a young child. Although I get in Aspie territory in a lot of these online tests, my score on this scale was EXTREMELY low - clearly not an Aspie. It seems to be a more appropriate test, even if it's not one that can be fully answered by oneself.

I found the scale online if anybody is interested, here: http://www.udel.edu/bkirby/asperger/...leAttwood.html
meyaj is offline  
post #35 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-28-2009, 09:07 PM
sa challenger
 
epril's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: arizona
Gender: Female
Age: 54
Posts: 5,079
Your Aspie score: 149 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 72 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

Doesn't surprise me; both my girls are Aspies. I very much enjoy the company of aspies or aspie-ish people too.
epril is offline  
post #36 of 173 (permalink) Old 09-28-2009, 09:11 PM
sa challenger
 
epril's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: arizona
Gender: Female
Age: 54
Posts: 5,079
Quote:
Originally Posted by antonina View Post
I had to address this quote as I am a special education teacher and work with students who are diagnosed with autism. These students DO WANT TO HAVE FRIENDS. They just can't understand why people are upset with them. I think dealing with bullying and rejection probably has turned adults with autism and asperger's off to attempting social interactions because they can go so wrong. People need to try to develop more awareness. I have noticed when I work with these kids I need to spell everything out literally. I tell them that what they are saying is hurting someone's feelings. I then explain why. I notice that they didn't mean to do this and they don't want the person to be mad at them. They just don't have social awareness. They need people to be literal and direct with them.
Well said.
epril is offline  
post #37 of 173 (permalink) Old 02-25-2010, 05:51 PM
SAS Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 141
The .pdf will break down the score. I had nothing unusual except a high social phobia score, and some mild ADHD.

No Asperger's.

The most interesting thing is that I'm an INFP. Strange because I've been called cold and logical. I scored really high on perception.
ThatWierdGuy is offline  
post #38 of 173 (permalink) Old 02-25-2010, 09:53 PM
SAS Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Sydney, Australia
Gender: Male
Age: 43
Posts: 35
Here's mine.

Not sure what this means, besides being somewhat in the middle, but tilting towards Aspie. And far towards Aspie when it comes to social, compulsive and especially communication.

Your Aspie score: 128 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 84 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie
Your MBTI type: ISTJ

kraigg is offline  
post #39 of 173 (permalink) Old 02-25-2010, 11:25 PM
SAS Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Victoria, Australia
Gender: Female
Age: 34
Posts: 407
.

Your Aspie score: 119 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 79 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie...I doubt it.
Your MBTI type: ISFJ... I usually get INFP or INFJ
Smitten is offline  
post #40 of 173 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 04:49 PM
Your Assumptions
 
odd_one_out's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 7,027
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwiftFire87 View Post
In fact, people with Asperger's syndrome often show intense focus, highly logical thinking, and exceptional abilities in math or science.
Aye there are many abilities. I'm in science. I've a highly systemised thinking style. I've also been found to have (by a researcher) exceptionally high levels of focus and hypersensitive hearing. I also have artistic and other abilities and extreme attention to detail.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SwiftFire87 View Post
If they learn to develop the appropriate coping mechanisms, people with Asperger's syndrome are quite capable of getting married, having children, becoming gainfully employed, and leading independent lives.
I stretched my coping mechanisms to the maximum for all my adult life and was/am (it's also been noted by my doctors) resourceful and strong. But I'm very disabled by it and its lack of recognition in the society in which I (chuckle) live.

Using your categories ...

Marriage - I've never desired this but wouldn't marry if I wanted to due to the difficulties I have with relationships, processing emotions, and becoming easily dependent on partners for basic functioning in a childlike way.

Children - I can hardly cope with my own life let alone be responsible for another's even if I wished. I wouldn't be able to fulfill their emotional needs.

The above 2 don't really matter to me but the following 2 do.

Gainful employment - I'm usually employed well below my skill and qualification level. Interviewers don't like my demeanour. Colleagues and supervisors misunderstand me. I have to battle sensory and anxiety issues each day. Despite this I've had some adequate employment experiences which, combined with a lack of spending, were enough to financially support me comfortably. But I can't support the required functioning levels for extended periods and am currently more disabled after battling with some systems to get justice.

Independent life - I had this for a brief time but went into a decline, losing weight due to my anxiety, sensory issues, and executive dysfunction. My friend found me underweight and unable to take care of basic tasks adequately such as housework, taking meds, shopping and a host of others. My friend's taking on the role of carer. We've become intimate but my relative lack of independence leads me to feel trapped around her, affecting our relationship. My doctor's referred me to Social Services. I'm going to employ a personal assistant through them but this'll only be for a few hours a week, which isn't enough for an independent adult life.

Apparently I am pretty average for someone with Asperger's (including the effort it took to get diagnosed and in being continually refused help).
odd_one_out is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
asperger's syndrome? inn3rlogic69 Secondary Disorders 4 02-05-2008 11:11 AM
NVLD & Asperger's Syndrome Mazy Secondary Disorders 8 05-10-2007 11:17 PM
I think I have Asperger's Syndrome... bartman101 Secondary Disorders 1 03-05-2007 06:18 PM
Asperger's Syndrome could be the CAUSE of Social Anxiety DAODOA Coping With Social Anxiety 8 02-09-2007 06:06 PM
Asperger's Syndrome Darrin Secondary Disorders 6 05-30-2006 05:05 PM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome