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post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-28-2015, 06:13 PM Thread Starter
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Poll: Americans still gloomy about the economy


AP-GFK POLL: AMERICANS STILL FEELING ECONOMIC GLOOM

BY EMILY SWANSON

ASSOCIATED PRESS

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories...10-28-15-00-46

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Americans are more likely than they were a year ago to have positive views of the nation's economy, but they're still feeling more pessimism than optimism, according to a new Associated Press-GfK poll conducted ahead of CNBC's GOP primary debate on Wednesday.

The candidates will attempt to impress Republicans in particular, who the poll finds feel much gloomier about the economy than Democrats.

Here are some things to know about opinions on the economy from the latest AP-GfK poll:

---

STILL FEELING GLOOMY

A majority of Americans - 54 percent - say the nation's economy is poor, the new poll shows. Just 45 percent call it good. Still, views of the economy are slightly rosier than they were over the summer, when a July AP-GfK poll found 41 percent of Americans described the economy as good, and more positive than they were a year ago, when just 38 percent said so.

Half of men, but just 4 in 10 women, describe the economy as good.

Americans are even less likely to see the nation heading in a positive direction overall. Just 36 percent think the country is heading in the right direction, while 63 percent think it's headed in the wrong direction.

More than 8 in 10 Americans in the new poll described the economy as an extremely or very important issue, down slightly since July. Still, the economy rates higher in importance than any other issue in the poll.

---

GOP ESPECIALLY UNHAPPY

The candidates will aim their messages at a Republican Party that has a particularly negative view of the economy.

While 65 percent of Democrats describe the economy as good, just 29 percent of Republicans say the same. Seven in 10 Republicans say the economy is poor, including more than 8 in 10 GOP supporters of the tea party. Eight-five percent of Republicans say the country is heading in the wrong direction.

Independents, too, are unhappy with the economy, with 33 percent seeing it as good and 62 percent poor.

---

NOT SEEING IMPROVEMENT

Few Americans - just 17 percent - think the economy has improved over the past month, while 21 percent think it has gotten worse and the bulk - 60 percent - think it's stayed about the same.

Most Americans don't expect to see improvement in either the nation's economy or their own financial situations in the next year, either.

Thirty-one percent say they expect the general economic situation to get better, 32 percent expect it to get worse, and 34 percent expect it to stay about the same. Likewise, 29 percent expect their household financial situation to get better, 25 percent expect it to get worse, and 44 percent expect it to stay the same.

Republicans are more likely than Democrats to say the economy has gotten worse in the last month, 31 percent to 13 percent. Democrats are more likely than Republicans to expect it to get better in the next year, 40 percent to 21 percent.

---

DEMOCRATS HOLD TRUST ADVANTAGE

Whichever GOP candidate emerges victorious in next year's presidential primaries will need to convince Americans that the party can do a better job than Democrats at handling economic issues.

Americans are slightly more likely to say they trust Democrats than Republicans more on handling the economy, 29 percent to 24 percent, the poll shows.

But neither party's a clear winner on the issue - 15 percent say they trust both equally and 30 percent say they trust neither party.

Republicans are more likely than Democrats to say they trust neither party, 29 percent to 17 percent. A majority of independents - 55 percent - don't trust either party.

---

DIVISION ON OBAMA'S HANDLING

Americans are slightly more likely to disapprove than approve of President Barack Obama's handling of the economy, 52 percent to 46 percent, according to the new poll. But that's an apparent rise in his approval rating on the issue since July, when just 42 percent said they approved.

Americans' rating of Obama on the economy is nearly identical to how they feel about how he's handling his job overall, with 46 percent approving and 52 percent disapproving.

--------------------

The AP-GfK Poll of 1,027 adults was conducted online from Oct. 15 to 19. The sample was drawn from GfK's probability-based KnowledgePanel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 3.3 percentage points.

Respondents were selected randomly using telephone or mail survey methods and interviewed online. People selected for KnowledgePanel without Internet access were provided it for free.
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post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-28-2015, 06:16 PM
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The GOP would only be unhappy because it's a Democrat in charge. Otherwise they'd be celebrating how much power Wall Street still has. Or I guess they'd be unhappy because of all the minimum wage talk and Keystone talk and stuff. So they know they're losing right now, even though more needs to change.

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post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-28-2015, 06:28 PM Thread Starter
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^ Who's been in charge the last seven years?


This is an extremely weak "recovery". Especially after seven years into it.

"We need a healthy economy and we shouldn't be embarrassed about our system. If you want to look at a system that is non-capitalistic, just take a look at what was perhaps the wealthiest country in the world and today people are starving to death. It's called Venezuela."

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post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 10:12 AM
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Well, duh!

NINETY-FIVE MILLION PEOPLE are out of work - and it's not reflected in the unemployment rate!

Basically, the Obomination knew this and made sure that:
(1) jobs were under the Obamacare 30-hour threshold, counting as jobs - people would have to work two jobs to equal one worth paying.
(2) unemployment extended to 99 weeks to fuel the dependency on long-term joblessness.
(3) make sure unemployment went out long enough so people could give up and not be counted.

Oh, everything is alright with 5.1% unemployment this month.

BIG FAT RASPBERRIES! (stick my tongue out!)

I need help on the job and am NOT getting it - seven years now, I have been in a group of four people doing the work of six - now seven!, and no one is hiring.

I can only do 50-55 hour weeks with my multitasking for so long and then even I break down!

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post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 10:17 AM
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But Barry said the economy is fine. He wouldn't lie to us!
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post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 12:06 PM
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^ Who's been in charge the last seven years?


This is an extremely weak "recovery". Especially after seven years into it.
obama's had republicans stalemating his every move, so we can't really blame just him.
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post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 12:11 PM
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obama's had republicans stalemating his every move, so we can't really blame just him.
****ing true. ^^^^

Hard to actually fix the country when Congress blindly denies anything you propose.
You know more Republicans support (a would be) TrumpCare over Obamacarr, which are the exact same plans just with different names?
Let sigh...Republicans are a special breed...
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post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 12:24 PM
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Sadly, the candidates will use this to their advantage to rile up voters. I'm sure many voters severely overestimate the impact a president has on the economy. When big downturns occur, people are hesitant to trust the economy even if there are signs of recovery, because it might just fall apart again. It'll take years of steadiness to heal these wounds, to change the mentality of people, and one person won't be fixing it, despite what grand ideas they spout off to the masses.
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post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 01:59 PM
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Things were great before Obama.. Oh wait..

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post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 04:20 PM
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Originally Posted by millenniumman75 View Post
NINETY-FIVE MILLION PEOPLE are out of work - and it's not reflected in the unemployment rate!
This is ADP

Change in Total Nonfarm Private Employment



http://www.adpemploymentreport.com/2...gust-2015.aspx

All it measures is raw number of jobs created or lost. Can you admit now that you're wrong? The employment market has recovered substantially under Obama after it cratered under Bush.

“We have to continually be jumping off cliffs and developing our wings on the way down.”

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post #11 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 04:22 PM
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This is ADP
All it measures is raw number of jobs created or lost. Can you admit now that you're wrong? The employment market has recovered substantially under Obama after it cratered under Bush.
Doesn't show the wages/quality though, which have been crappy for 35 years. Most of those 'gains' are probably part time.
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post #12 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 05:56 PM Thread Starter
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U.S. Growth Cools in Third Quarter

Economy plods along as inventory drawdown drags down GDP


http://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-econ...ter-1446122018

By ERIC MORATH
Updated Oct. 29, 2015 3:22 p.m. ET

The U.S. economy stayed afloat in the third quarter despite global turmoil, but it’s struggling to break out of the slow-growth pace that has plagued the economic expansion.

The economy grew at a modest 1.5% seasonally adjusted annual rate from July through September, the Commerce Department said Thursday. That marked a deceleration from the second quarter, when U.S. gross domestic product—the broadest measure of economic output—expanded at a 3.9% pace.

Solid consumer outlays and increased spending on business equipment and home building propelled the economy against overseas headwinds weighing on U.S. manufacturers. But from a year earlier, the growth advanced at a familiar 2% rate—showing the economy remains locked into a restrained expansion more than six years after the recession ended.

“The domestic economy isn’t on fire, but demand is looking relatively solid,” said James McCann, an economist with Standard Life Investments. “International developments take the sheen off it, but we think the momentum is genuine.”

Inventory levels, an often volatile component of GDP, exerted substantial pressure on the latest figures. Businesses clearing shelves subtracted 1.44 percentage points from the overall advance. A measure of purchases by U.S. residents, excluding changes in inventory levels, rose at a much healthier 2.9% pace last quarter.

The latest inventory swing could be a one-time correction, and some economists expect a snapback in the final three months of the year. But others say it shows businesses are concerned about demand, as evidenced by lackluster retail sales. Consumer outlays increased by 3.2% in the third quarter, but purchases of cars and other long-lasting goods drove that gain.

Disappointing sales caused PPG Industries Inc., maker of Glidden and Pittsburgh paint, to slow production so stores could thin their stockpiles.

“We had a wet June and people were anticipating a stronger paint season,” PPG Chief Executive Michael McGarry told investors this month. “We saw the major retail folks both in the U.S. and Canada start to destock late in the third quarter.” Mr. McGarry said he expects the effect to be short-lived, based on early October sales.

Unspectacular overall growth last quarter remains a worrying sign that the economic expansion could be losing steam.

The slowdown came at the same time employers eased hiring after adding an average of more than 200,000 jobs a month for a year and a half. Measures of industrial output show the manufacturing sector bordering on a contraction, reflecting the influence of a stronger dollar and China’s slowdown. And retail sales, outside of automotive purchases, declined in September and are up less than 1% from a year earlier.

Lower gasoline prices supported inflation-adjusted incomes last quarter, filtering through to solid overall household spending, said Paul Ashworth, an economist at Capital Economics. “Whether real incomes will continue to expand at such a rapid clip in the fourth quarter remains to be seen,” he said. “Gasoline prices have stabilized, employment gains have slowed and hourly wages still haven’t taken off.”

Lower gasoline prices, a revamped menu and refreshed stores are driving increased sales at Smoothie King locations, said Chief Operating Officer Tom O’Keefe. But he remains wary about the expansion’s durability.

“It’s sluggish,” he said. “I’m bullish about my business, but the economy isn’t really helping or hurting.”

The latest reading on economic growth, and a subsequent revision next month, will weigh on the minds of Federal Reserve officials when they meet next in December. The Fed held benchmark interest rates steady on Wednesday. The central bank said the economy “has been expanding at a moderate pace,” while explicitly noting a rate increase will be considered at the next policy-making meeting.

Thursday’s report showed a smaller increase in business investment than during the prior quarter, but the mix was different than some economists anticipated. Investment in equipment, a category that had been tied to a slowing oil industry, accelerated. But spending on construction fell and intellectual property outlays posted only a small gain.

Trade proved to be a neutral factor for the overall economy, easing concerns about exports falling amid weak global demand. Instead, trade subtracted 0.03 percentage point from the growth rate. Exports, which add to output, increased at a 1.9% rate during the quarter. Imports, which subtract from output, increased 1.8%.

Trade data tends to be volatile and is often revised in subsequent releases.

Government spending advanced more slowly in the third quarter than the prior three months. State and local governments helped offset a pullback in defense outlays. The public sector is poised to add to economic growth this year for the first time since 2010.

Home building and improvements contributed less to economic growth last quarter than in the spring, but the housing sector remains a bright spot for the economy in 2015. Residential investment was up 8.9% in the third quarter from a year earlier, the best annual gain in two years.

Fulton Homes, a Tempe, Ariz. builder, has pulled 50% more permits through three quarters of the year compared to a year earlier. Vice President Dennis Webb said gyrations in the global economy don’t seem to be worrying home buyers.

“They don’t really follow what’s going on in China and Greece—they follow what’s going on in Gilbert,” he said, referring to the Phoenix suburb. “The economy here is good, employers are moving in…There’s a lot of pent-up demand for housing.”

"We need a healthy economy and we shouldn't be embarrassed about our system. If you want to look at a system that is non-capitalistic, just take a look at what was perhaps the wealthiest country in the world and today people are starving to death. It's called Venezuela."

- Michael Bloomberg

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- Former CBS News Reporter Lara Logan
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post #13 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 05:59 PM Thread Starter
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But Barry said the economy is fine. He wouldn't lie to us!
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No. Never.

Some areas are doing well. I happen to live in an area that is booming. But there are many areas in the USA that are struggling. States that are managed by Republicans practicing sound financial management have weathered the storm and are doing quite well despite Obamanomics.
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post #14 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 07:26 PM
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No. Never.

Some areas are doing well. I happen to live in an area that is booming. But there are many areas in the USA that are struggling. States that are managed by Republicans practicing sound financial management have weathered the storm and are doing quite well despite Obamanomics.
You ever been to Kansas?
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post #15 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 08:20 PM
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NINETY-FIVE MILLION PEOPLE are out of work - and it's not reflected in the unemployment rate!

Yes, because kids, disabled people, and old people need to buck up and get a job. Along with those lazy mothers who are raising kids and staying home, right?

It looks like someone on AM radio or Fox News said "95 million", then the blogs took it and wrote some drivel without caring if it was factual or not, then the right-wing posters never stopped to think that they might have been lied to.

A little hint, even during the Bush years or the Clinton ones before it, total employment only got up to 133 million or so. I think it is around 124 million now. The entire US population is 330 million, with more and more people turning 65 than are being born. And robots and AI will eventually make 50% of the current jobs obsolete, so that is what we really should be discussing and getting people ready for the transition to a world where most people have few job prospects or they don't need to constantly have a job.
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post #16 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 08:39 PM
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Yes, because kids, disabled people, and old people need to buck up and get a job. Along with those lazy mothers who are raising kids and staying home, right?

It looks like someone on AM radio or Fox News said "95 million", then the blogs took it and wrote some drivel without caring if it was factual or not, then the right-wing posters never stopped to think that they might have been lied to.

A little hint, even during the Bush years or the Clinton ones before it, total employment only got up to 133 million or so. I think it is around 124 million now. The entire US population is 330 million, with more and more people turning 65 than are being born. And robots and AI will eventually make 50% of the current jobs obsolete, so that is what we really should be discussing and getting people ready for the transition to a world where most people have few job prospects or they don't need to constantly have a job.
Must've been a huge wave of immigrants yesterday for our population to jump 10 million overnight lol

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post #17 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 08:46 PM
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And robots and AI will eventually make 50% of the current jobs obsolete, so that is what we really should be discussing and getting people ready for the transition to a world where most people have few job prospects or they don't need to constantly have a job.
In a world where human beings are no longer needed for the means of production, will human beings become obsolete? Will there be a point in breeding more humans, if robots and AI could just do all the work, produce all the food, deliver all the goods, etc? What will humans do if so few of them are doing work? (Mostly maintaining said robots, probably.) What will we do for all of our lives? Just sit around and do nothing until we die?

Honestly it's very interesting to think about. The robot revolution could lead to the downfall of modern society.
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post #18 of 18 (permalink) Old 10-29-2015, 09:42 PM
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Must've been a huge wave of immigrants yesterday for our population to jump 10 million overnight lol
Fine 321,368,864.

https://www.cia.gov/library/publicat.../2119rank.html

Or maybe 322,058,010 no 322,058,011 ... is more accurate.

http://www.census.gov/popclock/

Although I'm not sure if the government really knows exactly how many people are in this country who overstayed visas or snuck across the border.

I wonder if that includes ex-pats living aboard, but who still have American citizenship and pay US taxes? Maybe they should be counted too.
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