Why Does Anxiety Manifest Later In Life? - Social Anxiety Forum
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post #1 of 45 (permalink) Old 08-31-2019, 08:31 AM Thread Starter
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Why Does Anxiety Manifest Later In Life?


People who have anxiety disorders usually start experiencing them in their teenage years.....sometimes later on too.


Does anyone else find this weird? People say these anxiety disorders are usually neurological. So shouldn't it be there from the very start? If its in someone's neurology, shouldn't they be experiencing it from the moment they turn 4 or 5?



Why does it manifest so late? Could it be that we were doing something right in our childhoods which we aren't doing as adults?
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post #2 of 45 (permalink) Old 08-31-2019, 09:05 AM
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Most likely it didn't matter as much - "you'll grow out of it" and then you don't.


Also if one's anxiety partially stems from mentally illnesses, quite a few do start in your 15-25 age range.
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post #3 of 45 (permalink) Old 08-31-2019, 09:38 AM
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Mine started around 14-15. I think I was around 19 or 20 when I was diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia. Was at its worst late teens and early 20's, then came back pretty bad around 30. Been better since then.

I don't remember being anxious about anything as a young child. In high school I stopped talking in classes and skipped all my speeches in speech class. I think I was 17 or 18 the first time I had a panic attack. I went to the emergency room thinking I was dying. Haven't had a full on panic attack in years now.
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post #4 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-01-2019, 09:56 AM
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No sadly I've had anxiety issues my entire life.

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post #5 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-01-2019, 10:05 AM
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I think puberty is supposed to be a trigger for many different mental health issues.
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post #6 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-01-2019, 10:12 AM
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I remember being really shy/quiet as a young child but still had a few friends, I didn't become a full on recluse till 14, I think people prone to anxiety type disorders are just more sensitive to both positive & negative stimuli in the beginning, everyone knows life is not kind to those sensitive or different for the most part in schools, other "normal" kids etc.

I think depending on what they're on the recieving end more off is what they can develop into & of course everyone is different with different childhood situations, people also have different levels of sensitivity/tolerance to get to their breaking point so it's conceivable people can make it to adulthood before the sum total of their Constitution & experiences manifest.






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post #7 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-01-2019, 10:32 AM
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I think that's because everyday life challenges and responsibilities start to become more oppressive later on in life and worsen a pre-existing mental illness. I think anxiety and depression are highly influenced by your lifestyle so it makes sense they would worsen over time rather than when you're a child and don't have many responsibilities.

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post #8 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-01-2019, 10:59 AM
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For some people it can manifest early in life - either due to trauma and/or having an easier predisposition for it. Others can develop it later because something can 'activate' their predisposition which didn't occur to them earlier on in life. I think the more severe cases tend to come from the former since added time and life experiences can enhance it.
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post #9 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-01-2019, 11:09 AM
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No sadly I've had anxiety issues my entire life.
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post #10 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-01-2019, 12:40 PM
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Funny that so many here can date it back to 14-15 years. Mine also started at 14 and got worse till 19-20, than, after 24-25, it started to get a little better.

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post #11 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-01-2019, 01:09 PM
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Most likely it didn't matter as much - "you'll grow out of it" and then you don't.


Also if one's anxiety partially stems from mentally illnesses, quite a few do start in your 15-25 age range.
This is pretty much what happened with me. I was very shy as a kid (from what I remember - although according to an old report card I was talkative when I was a young child). My parents assumed I would grow out of it, but I didn't. I was overlooked as one of five kids in the family, and my issues were never properly addressed.

I remember first becoming aware of my social isolation around age 10 or so, which makes sense when you think about it. When you're a little kid, your parents are responsible for your social life. Then, when you get older, you're supposed to make friends on your own. I didn't.

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post #12 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 01:55 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Persephone The Dread View Post
No sadly I've had anxiety issues my entire life.

From what age?
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post #13 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 01:55 PM Thread Starter
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I think puberty is supposed to be a trigger for many different mental health issues.

But then shouldn't it stop after puberty goes away?
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post #14 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 01:58 PM Thread Starter
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I think that's because everyday life challenges and responsibilities start to become more oppressive later on in life and worsen a pre-existing mental illness. I think anxiety and depression are highly influenced by your lifestyle so it makes sense they would worsen over time rather than when you're a child and don't have many responsibilities.

Hmm this is what I think too. But I wonder if really rich people go through this (the ones who have anxiety disorders). Because after a certain point of wealth, all the regular anxieties that people have don't affect you because money is security.
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post #15 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 03:49 PM
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But then shouldn't it stop after puberty goes away?
Did every other change that happened to your body because of puberty go away after it ended?
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post #16 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 04:09 PM
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From what age?
From as early as I can remember, and definitely at school. I was always sensitive.

When I was in infant school my brother was examined by a psychologist and eventually diagnosed with dyslexia. On his report that my family were given it mentioned under family background that I have selective mutism (my parents were not told this besides via some report paper about my brother.) I do remember having hearing tests at some point so I was obviously being checked for something while at school but my memory of that is vague.

I would say throughout my life there's been ups and downs when it comes to anxiety, and in different environments, but social anxiety isn't my only problem. It might be more accurate to say I've always been hypersensitive and my ability to cope with that has also varied. I may well have undiagnosed autism tbh though some of my sensory processing weirdness could be a result of selective mutism since apparently they are related.

edit: And yeah I point out the fact that the only reason my parents knew was because I was a footnote in my brother's diagnoses a lot because honestly the incompetence of not telling parents a child you're apparently investigating has a mental health/development disorder of some kind:



not that it mattered cause like 0 help/treatment/support occured so. *repeat above gif*

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post #17 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 04:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Persephone The Dread View Post
From as early as I can remember, and definitely at school. I was always sensitive.

When I was in infant school my brother was examined by a psychologist and eventually diagnosed with dyslexia. On his report that my family were given it mentioned under family background that I have selective mutism (my parents were not told this besides via some report paper about my brother.) I do remember having hearing tests at some point so I was obviously being checked for something while at school but my memory of that is vague.
I clearly remember an incident in kindergarten when they called in an audiologist because they apparently thought I was hard of hearing. I am not sure if he was checking any of the other kids (my memory of it is pretty specific to my encounter with him). But yeah. I didn't like him as soon as I saw him and I was not interested in cooperating with his poking and prodding so that did not go well. And I was looking through my scrap book a couple years ago and the letter the teacher sent my mother about it was in there. Displayed as if it was some kind of accomplishment to be proud of. WTF?

Seriously. Some parents seem to think the issues their kids have are cute when they're really young. Like my nephew is kind of mean and not very well behaved and my mother thinks it's cute. And it's like...yeah. They think it's cute now. When he's a 16 year old miscreant it's not gonna be so cute anymore and no one will give a rat's *** about him or trying to help him.

I do not think whatever was initiated on that day in kindergarten with me was ever followed up on. Pretty much my mother just ignored anything that was problematic. Apparently some parents get offended by the idea that their kids have issues.

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post #18 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 04:56 PM
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I clearly remember an incident in kindergarten when they called in an audiologist because they apparently thought I was hard of hearing. I am not sure if he was checking any of the other kids (my memory of it is pretty specific to my encounter with him). But yeah. I didn't like him as soon as I saw him and I was not interested in cooperating with his poking and prodding so that did not go well. And I was looking through my scrap book a couple years ago and the letter the teacher sent my mother about it was in there. Displayed as if it was some kind of accomplishment to be proud of. WTF?

Seriously. Some parents seem to think the issues their kids have are cute when they're really young. Like my nephew is kind of mean and not very well behaved and my mother thinks it's cute. And it's like...yeah. They think it's cute now. When he's a 16 year old miscreant it's not gonna be so cute anymore and no one will give a rat's *** about him or trying to help him.

I do not think whatever was initiated on that day in kindergarten with me was ever followed up on. Pretty much my mother just ignored anything that was problematic. Apparently some parents get offended by the idea that their kids have issues.
My memory is really vague so I just have this impression not even of any specific adult but just being asked repeatedly to do something when I hear a sound lol. I think I must have been like 5-6 then.

But yeah pretty much, people often ignore the problems in kids and then when they're older they realise they ****ed up I guess, but any attempt to help is going to be far less effective by that point.

At least my mum and the school were very involved with getting my brother help for his dyslexia I guess (which he didn't enjoy and found frustrating,) though from his pov a lot of the stuff especially in secondary school didn't help that much.

It's a common problem even today parents have to be really on top of that stuff because even when they are and the kids have blatantly obvious symptoms, and it's a disorder that people take more seriously they'll still struggle to get their kids help like the parents in this video:


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post #19 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-03-2019, 07:25 AM Thread Starter
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Did every other change that happened to your body because of puberty go away after it ended?

Yeah a lot. During puberty people usually have more acne than normal, are usually more prone to irritation, higher sex drive, more aggressive, more susceptible to peer pressure, and get confused often........after puberty goes away, all of that comes down and normalizes.
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post #20 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-03-2019, 07:34 AM Thread Starter
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From as early as I can remember, and definitely at school. I was always sensitive.

When I was in infant school my brother was examined by a psychologist and eventually diagnosed with dyslexia. On his report that my family were given it mentioned under family background that I have selective mutism (my parents were not told this besides via some report paper about my brother.) I do remember having hearing tests at some point so I was obviously being checked for something while at school but my memory of that is vague.

I would say throughout my life there's been ups and downs when it comes to anxiety, and in different environments, but social anxiety isn't my only problem. It might be more accurate to say I've always been hypersensitive and my ability to cope with that has also varied. I may well have undiagnosed autism tbh though some of my sensory processing weirdness could be a result of selective mutism since apparently they are related.

edit: And yeah I point out the fact that the only reason my parents knew was because I was a footnote in my brother's diagnoses a lot because honestly the incompetence of not telling parents a child you're apparently investigating has a mental health/development disorder of some kind:



not that it mattered cause like 0 help/treatment/support occured so. *repeat above gif*

Similar experience with me. Couldn't cope well with anything like the other kids could at school and I was always lost....didn't talk much either. It always took me a while to open up.
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