Do you think life will be discovered onnother planet in your lifetime? - Page 3 - Social Anxiety Forum
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post #41 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-22-2020, 12:38 PM
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Pessimistically, I hope not.

We would only try to colonize it and do the same destruction that we are doing to our current planet now.
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post #42 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-24-2020, 02:13 PM
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There's actually a real chance of this happening. One way life can be detected on other planets is by looking at the composition of the atmosphere and there are plans to launch and build telescopes in the 2020s and 2030s that will do this. And quite a few planets which are listed as potentially habitable have already been found, so they'll be observed in more detail in the future. I don't know if the technology in some of the upcoming telescopes will be advanced enough to give a very detailed analysis of exoplanets and their atmospheres, but the telescopes that will come after them in the coming decades could. I wouldn't be that surprised if we found life (or at least signs of it) on another planet by the end of this century, and some astronomers have predicted we could too.

It's also possible the first extraterrestrial life we find will be on a moon in our solar system. One of the theories of how life originated on Earth is that it began deep underwater around hydrothermal vents. There's evidence that moons like Europa and Enceladus have vast oceans of liquid water underneath their crust and scientists have speculated that they could have life in them because the gravity of Jupiter and Saturn causes these moons to contract and expand which could create hydrothermal vents. Scientists want to send orbiters and submarines to these moons because of this.
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post #43 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-24-2020, 02:21 PM
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Pessimistically, I hope not.

We would only try to colonize it and do the same destruction that we are doing to our current planet now.
****, never thought of it that way 😞 Always assumed they'd be more advanced than us.
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post #44 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-24-2020, 03:02 PM
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There's actually a planet discovered called Earth 2.0. It is relatively close to its sun that can make it similarly habitable as our planet along with the radius, mass, and hydrogen-rich atmosphere.

https://scitechdaily.com/earth-2-0-a...ions-for-life/
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post #45 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-24-2020, 10:24 PM
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twice the size of earth, they either are really strong or really small


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post #46 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-25-2020, 06:37 AM
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This was uploaded today:

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post #47 of 56 (permalink) Old 07-07-2020, 08:26 AM Thread Starter
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It's also possible the first extraterrestrial life we find will be on a moon in our solar system. One of the theories of how life originated on Earth is that it began deep underwater around hydrothermal vents. There's evidence that moons like Europa and Enceladus have vast oceans of liquid water underneath their crust and scientists have speculated that they could have life in them because the gravity of Jupiter and Saturn causes these moons to contract and expand which could create hydrothermal vents. Scientists want to send orbiters and submarines to these moons because of this.
Sending orbiters and submarines to these moons to look under their vast oceans of water I think would be out best chance to find life in our solar system. I would think the technology exists to do this pretty much now? Send a very small submarine with a camera on it to see whats under water (perhaps a school of fish will just happen to swim past the camera). Im sure there are instruments as well you could attach that could detect life at a bacterial level in water as well.

I guess the biggest tech challenge would be getting the submarine or probe underwater without damaging it
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post #48 of 56 (permalink) Old 07-07-2020, 06:22 PM
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Sending orbiters and submarines to these moons to look under their vast oceans of water I think would be out best chance to find life in our solar system. I would think the technology exists to do this pretty much now? Send a very small submarine with a camera on it to see whats under water (perhaps a school of fish will just happen to swim past the camera). Im sure there are instruments as well you could attach that could detect life at a bacterial level in water as well.

I guess the biggest tech challenge would be getting the submarine or probe underwater without damaging it
There's going to be Europa fly-by missions by both ESA and NASA with planned launches in 2022 and 2024. From the articles and videos I've seen a submarine mission won't happen for at least 15-20 years, and the best way to go through the crust might be to melt it. I wish there was a submarine mission coming soon, it would be exciting.
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post #49 of 56 (permalink) Old 07-07-2020, 07:53 PM Thread Starter
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There's going to be Europa fly-by missions by both ESA and NASA with planned launches in 2022 and 2024. From the articles and videos I've seen a submarine mission won't happen for at least 15-20 years, and the best way to go through the crust might be to melt it. I wish there was a submarine mission coming soon, it would be exciting.
I wonder what kind of info they will be able to get on there fly by missions of Europe? Just photos and probaly some instrument measurements would be my guess? Not likely to be enough to prove life. Unless they happen to just get a picture of a fish jumping out of the water like they do on Earth! lol
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post #50 of 56 (permalink) Old 07-07-2020, 08:00 PM
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There's going to be Europa fly-by missions by both ESA and NASA with planned launches in 2022 and 2024. From the articles and videos I've seen a submarine mission won't happen for at least 15-20 years, and the best way to go through the crust might be to melt it. I wish there was a submarine mission coming soon, it would be exciting.
If they are still allowed to power probes with reactors, could they possibly melt through with a laser?

/WYSD
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post #51 of 56 (permalink) Old 07-08-2020, 06:54 AM
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I wonder what kind of info they will be able to get on there fly by missions of Europe? Just photos and probaly some instrument measurements would be my guess? Not likely to be enough to prove life. Unless they happen to just get a picture of a fish jumping out of the water like they do on Earth! lol
Did you know one of the things they want orbiters to do is fly through the plumes on Europa that have water vapour in them? They could have instruments on them to analyze the water that could help get an idea of what it's like beneath the crust.
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If they are still allowed to power probes with reactors, could they possibly melt through with a laser?
I think a submarine would have to be nuclear powered, I haven't read about any other alternative to power it. There's a good chance of it using a laser to melt through the ice too, that seems to be one of the leading ideas.
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post #52 of 56 (permalink) Old 07-08-2020, 08:21 AM Thread Starter
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Did you know one of the things they want orbiters to do is fly through the plumes on Europa that have water vapour in them? They could have instruments on them to analyze the water that could help get an idea of what it's like beneath the crust.
Yea I think I have read that before that they want to fly through the plumes on Europa that have water vapour in them. Hopefully there are able to make to get the tech right to make that work and can get some valuable info for it. I wonder what we could potentially learn from it? Probaly the chemical or biological signature of the plums. I guess if they can detect organic compounds that would indicate a good chance of life.
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post #53 of 56 (permalink) Old 07-08-2020, 09:10 PM
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I think there's a non zero chance that in the relatively close future some form of microscopic life may be found by a probe on Mars or Europa. But would that really change much for humanity?


Even if the conditions for the emergence of life are very rare, the universe is such a mindbogglingly enormous place that there are probably an immense number of planets with life in it, sentient life may be much rarer, have a tendency to self destruct along the way and the distances in time and space so enormous that any sentient species may never encounter each other.


I think it's fascinating and sad to think that there may be millions of civilizations that we couldn't even begin to imagine that have risen and fallen before we ever came to be and that will come along long after we're gone. But unless one really advanced finds us and decides to reveal themselves, I don't see much of a chance of us ever encountering one before we destroy ourselves.
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post #54 of 56 (permalink) Old 07-17-2020, 07:41 AM
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Thought this was sort of interesting and relevant to this thread. It's about why discovering alien life is something we maybe shouldn't hope for. And it isn't because they might invade us; it has to do with the Fermi paradox.

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post #55 of 56 (permalink) Old 07-18-2020, 05:33 AM
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Thought this was sort of interesting and relevant to this thread. It's about why discovering alien life is something we maybe shouldn't hope for. And it isn't because they might invade us; it has to do with the Fermi paradox.


Yeah its weird aliens havent made themselves known to us. But it could be explained by memory modification. There are some mysteries like Nasca lines and the construction of the pyramids. Maybe aliens had a hand in them before wiping memories.

if aliens civilisations are out there and alive, the great filter doesnt apply.


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post #56 of 56 (permalink) Old 07-18-2020, 01:45 PM
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Here's a video where an astronomer talks about how telescopes will be able to observe exoplanets.

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