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Old 06-07-2011, 06:43 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Default Selective mutism!

I found this on virgin teach shooter page on wiki,,,,,,,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selective_mutism

mmm, not sure but I think it's something noraml for people with SAD..
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Old 06-07-2011, 08:01 PM   #2 (permalink)
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my best friend had selective mutism, his condition confused the **** out of teachers in my high school until the school hired a special counselor specifically to help kids like him graduate. I didnt even know what his problem was until the counsoler came and identified it. I think it goes more extreme than just normal SAD; plenty of people are capable of speaking but SA just makes them uncomfy and unable to initiate conversations. My friend though, he could not speak at all to anyone except the counselor. He was the soccer teams star and also very good looking too, so he wasn't an outcast per se and had lots of girls fluttering around him, but he never spoke to them. He didnt even talk to his girlfriend, he would only talk to her on MSN chat. At school I would have to ask him everything in yes/no form so that he could communicate with just head movements. To this day I still dont quite get how he managed to graduate on time.

hes cured now, once he moved back to his home country he finally relaxed and now we speak fine, but he still has problems speaking english to people he doesnt know because he also has a stutter. but yes, i wouldnt say its normal for people with SAD to have selective mutism. that condition tends to take lack of communication to the extreme.
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Old 06-07-2011, 08:41 PM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPC View Post
my best friend had selective mutism, his condition confused the **** out of teachers in my high school until the school hired a special counselor specifically to help kids like him graduate. I didnt even know what his problem was until the counsoler came and identified it. I think it goes more extreme than just normal SAD; plenty of people are capable of speaking but SA just makes them uncomfy and unable to initiate conversations. My friend though, he could not speak at all to anyone except the counselor. He was the soccer teams star and also very good looking too, so he wasn't an outcast per se and had lots of girls fluttering around him, but he never spoke to them. He didnt even talk to his girlfriend, he would only talk to her on MSN chat. At school I would have to ask him everything in yes/no form so that he could communicate with just head movements. To this day I still dont quite get how he managed to graduate on time.

hes cured now, once he moved back to his home country he finally relaxed and now we speak fine, but he still has problems speaking english to people he doesnt know because he also has a stutter. but yes, i wouldnt say its normal for people with SAD to have selective mutism. that condition tends to take lack of communication to the extreme.
That sounds heavenly, a girlfriend that you don't have to talk to. :P
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Old 06-07-2011, 11:46 PM   #4 (permalink)
 
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The difference in SA and SM seems like it's mainly one of degree, except with no talking instead of just less talking.
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Old 06-08-2011, 06:15 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
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My sister had it when she was in primary school. She couldn't even answer the register; the other kids had to tell the teacher she was there. This was over twenty years ago and there wasn't much awareness back then that selective mutism even existed, so nobody thought it was a problem.
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Old 06-08-2011, 07:09 PM   #6 (permalink)
 
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I sometimes think i have something along the lines of that. Around my immediate family i'm quite outspoken and can be quite cocky, lol. With strangers or settings i'm not used to however I'm painfully shy and speaking up is very difficult.
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Old 06-09-2011, 02:02 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
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I had this when I was a little kid. Apparently, as a baby I was sociable. Then around 2 or 3 years old, I was in our yard and the gardener came out of nowhere and freaked me out. He was mowing the grass and the noise of the mower was really loud. I think the fact that he was a stranger and the noise traumatized me somehow. My parents said that i became extremely shy after that.

lol it sounds really lame, but that is what caused/triggered my selective mutism and social anxiety. i've read and watched documentaries about selective mutism, and they say that we SM/SAD people are more afraid of new things than the average person is. We have an overload of whatever chemical causes that fear (sorry I don't remember exactly). There was an example in this documentary where the parents said their daughter walked up to these two adults. She thought they were her parents, but when she realized they were strangers, she started crying and panicking. They said after that, she developed SM. So that is a bit similar to what happened to me.

Here is the documentary: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWYtZ...eature=related
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Old 06-09-2011, 02:34 AM   #8 (permalink)
 
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If you would all like to know more about me...

THat youtube link pretty much describes my early childhood. I suggest you all watch it. It describes how I felt with SM, and it also is related to SAD.

ANyways...I stopped talking to strangers after that freak out. I only talked to my family and my best friends. In school, I didn't say anything. However, I did make a lot of friends that I didn;t even talk to! It was easy for me to play with other kids at recess, whether it was basketball, kickball, handball, etc. A couple kids came to my house to play. Yet I didn;t even talk to them lol. It was weird. But that was how I was.

In 1st grade, my mom would pick me up after school and stay with me and the teacher. My mom would help me try to read out loud in front of the teacher. I could read and speak normally, and my teacher knew, but my mom wanted to teacher to hear me. I just couldn't do it though. It was so hard to speak up. Eventually, at the end of the year, after school, I read out loud finally.

After that, I gradually became more comfortable speaking. I remember another incident where I answered the phone on accident and our neighbor heard me speak for the first time. She was so happy lol. THat helped me speak more too. In 2nd grade, I began whispering to my classmates. By the middle of the year, I began talking to them normally. My teacher even told me to shush once (haha i know, what an accomplishment). Between grades 2 and 5, I spoke well in front of others. I even acted hyper at times in front of strangers. This period was the happiest of my life. I remember not being shy and just having fun with my family, friends, classmates, etc.

THen in middle school, I joined a new school and became shy again. No selective mutism, just social anxiety. Ever since then, I have had SAD. In a way, it feel similar to SM, even though I speak to strangers now. SOmetimes, I just shut down though, and I don;t know what to say to people other than "I don't know." or a shoulder shrug. Also, the situation has to be right for me to feel comfortable to speak freely. It's hard to explain, but that's how i feel at times. I'm sure other socially anxious people can relate.
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