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Old 06-28-2011, 06:15 AM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Default Klinefelters syndrome and SA

it is likely that many of the males having social anxiety disorder may be secondary to their klinefelters syndrome, or at least could be due to low testosterone levels. Many of klinefelter's behaviourial symptoms are strikingly similar to that of SA: such as,

Taller than average stature
Longer legs, shorter torso and broader hips compared with other boys
Absent, delayed or incomplete puberty
After puberty, less muscular bodies and less facial and body hair compared with other teens
Small, firm testicles
Small penis
Enlarged breast tissue (gynecomastia)
Weak bones
Low energy levels
Shyness
Difficulty expressing feelings or socializing
Problems with reading, writing, spelling or math
Attention problems
Infertility
Small testicles and penis
Taller than average stature
Weak bones
Decreased facial and body hair
Enlarged breast tissue
Decreased sex drive or sexual problems

Source:http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/kli...ction=symptoms

they have many other similar problems........just google for symptoms of klinefelter
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Old 06-28-2011, 06:21 AM   #2 (permalink)
 
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Males with Klinefelter syndrome appear to have reduced abilities in specific areas, including:1
Language development. Boys with Klinefelter syndrome often have delayed or slowly developing speech skills and poor verbal skills.
Critical thinking skills, problem solving, and ability to plan.
Multi-tasking.
Impulse control.
Response time.

Some research shows that these problems with learning and behavior may be caused by the way the brain grows in males who have Klinefelter syndrome.2

Boys may have emotional problems that range from being shy and immature to being overly anxious or aggressive. They may also have poor social skills, which may cause problems for them in school and in other social situations. They are at risk for developing psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety, depression, and drug and alcohol abuse.

http://www.everydayhealth.com/health...-symptoms.aspx
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Old 06-28-2011, 06:40 AM   #3 (permalink)
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I doubt there's any direct (causal) relationship. I think being a male with klinefelters syndrome will likely increase one chance's of having SAD but so will being fat, skinny, ugly, having some other physical or psychological/social/developmental impairment or even certain temperaments or traits (shyness/introversion/AS) but it's not the cause in my opinion.

I think such things like the above may lead one to have a higher chance of social failure (because people are less accepting of differences) which can lead to SAD and eventually to avoidance: you realize you aren't good socially or are less accepted, so social situations became aversive to you.
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Old 06-28-2011, 08:35 PM   #4 (permalink)
 
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Klinefelter's syndrome is pretty rare and SA is actually one of the more common mental health issues under depression. It is unlikely that most of the men on this site have it. I also work with kids with special needs. I worked with a boy with Klinefelter's and he had no problem speaking up in class and also arguing with adults even when he was wrong. He definitely was not shy. I'm sure some guys with Klinefelter's do have SA but so do people with learning disabilities, speech and language impairments, a rough childhood, weight problems, or any other number of issues.
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Old 05-21-2013, 08:40 AM   #5 (permalink)
 
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"it is likely that many of the males having social anxiety disorder may be secondary to their klinefelters syndrome, or at least could be due to low testosterone levels. Many of klinefelter's behaviourial symptoms are strikingly similar to that of SA: such as,"

"Taller than average stature"

Nope.

"Longer legs, shorter torso"

nope but I do have extra long arms.

"and broader hips compared with other boys"

nope never did have.

"Absent, delayed or incomplete puberty"

Hello my name is (am I allowed to say?) I was diagnosed with Klinefelter's syndrome in 1976. Since I saw this post just tonight/day I thought I'd offer my 2 cents worth.

So since Klinefelter's syndrome manifests after the onset of puberty, I'd say absent puberty is wrong. Delayed, yeah a little time in some, incomplete, now that is much more likely.

"After puberty, less muscular bodies and less facial and body hair compared with other teens"

I'd say 'After the onset of puberty', as puberty is often stalled. And if of course with adequate therapy it's not seen at all, getting adequate therapy is the hard part.

"Small, firm testicles"

Yeup that's what causes Klinefelter's syndrome.

"Small penis"

I've never had any complaints. It's an issue for about 23% of XXY boys, and is treated with testosterone, in infancy.

"Enlarged breast tissue (gynaecomastia)"

Yeup, about 40% of XXY boys develop gynaecomastia, compared to roughly 50% of XY boys or the usual variety. But since we're so much fewer in number it appears more frequent. And in XY boys it usually goes away of it's own accord, but in us it doesn't, it needs surgery.

"Weak bones"

Well for men who've been undiagnosed for many years, yeah I'd say so, but not children and teens.


"Low energy levels"

I'd say so.

"Shyness"

For children and teens, see how shy I am?

"Difficulty expressing feelings or socializing"

For XXY boys yes, XXY men too, until they learn it which they can if they try hard.

"Problems with reading, writing, spelling or math"

Depends on the individual.

"Attention problems"

Depends on the individual

"Infertility"

Yeup.

"Small testicles and penis"

Looks like a double up. I do not have a small penis, I never have had.

"Taller than average stature"

I'm not but it is fairly common, for a very good reason.

"Decreased sex drive or sexual problems"

It's fairly regular in untreated individuals.


"they have many other similar problems........just google for symptoms of klinefelter"

The clinics and online pages list every possible problem they can find, but every individual doesn't have all of them. There is wide variability in symptoms, some XXY men having none at all and being fertile. Most XXY guys are never diagnosed and die of associated conditions you've not listed.
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Old 05-21-2013, 08:48 AM   #6 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antonina View Post
Klinefelter's syndrome is pretty rare and SA is actually one of the more common mental health issues under depression. It is unlikely that most of the men on this site have it. I also work with kids with special needs. I worked with a boy with Klinefelter's and he had no problem speaking up in class and also arguing with adults even when he was wrong. He definitely was not shy. I'm sure some guys with Klinefelter's do have SA but so do people with learning disabilities, speech and language impairments, a rough childhood, weight problems, or any other number of issues.
We don't know how common Klinefelter's syndrome is, but just one karyotype that can lead to KS is found between 1:500 to 1:1000 live male births, that makes XXY very common, the most common sex chromosome aneuploidy there is.

You've probably taught more XXY boys than you know. I gather you're a teacher, yes?
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Old 05-21-2013, 08:54 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kon View Post
I doubt there's any direct (causal) relationship. I think being a male with klinefelters syndrome will likely increase one chance's of having SAD but so will being fat, skinny, ugly, having some other physical or psychological/social/developmental impairment or even certain temperaments or traits (shyness/introversion/AS) but it's not the cause in my opinion.

I think such things like the above may lead one to have a higher chance of social failure (because people are less accepting of differences) which can lead to SAD and eventually to avoidance: you realize you aren't good socially or are less accepted, so social situations became aversive to you.
Oh shocking, I forgot to look at the dates, I thought because this post was in my first page of searches that it was new, it's nearly 2 years old!

I think an XXY man whether he has KS or not is a good candidate for SAD.
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