Introversion and Autism - Social Anxiety Forum
X

Download the SAS Android App

Or switch to mobile version of the forums

X

Download the SAS iPhone App

Or switch to mobile version of the forums

Help/FAQLog InJoin SAS
Go Back   Social Anxiety Forum > Recovery > Secondary Disorders

Reply
Old 12-30-2010, 11:23 AM   #1 (permalink)
Kon
 
Kon's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Toronto, Canada
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,811



Default Introversion and Autism

Very interesting article:

INTROVERSION AND AUTISM: A CONCEPTUAL EXPLORATION OF THE PLACEMENT OF INTROVERSION ON THE AUTISM SPECTRUM

The conceptualization of the personality construct of introversion has been problematic since the termís inception due to the complexity and seemingly self-contradictory nature of the collection of attributes of which it is comprised. To advance the understanding of introversion, I propose that it is a continuous segment of the non-clinical part of the autism spectrum, and that it is not the same as the inverse of extraversion. When introversion and autism are placed on the same continuum, the nature of the relationship of the traits becomes more apparent, and new possibilities are available for exploration of both autism and introversion. This review of literature traces the origins and development of the concept of introversion and places it on the autism spectrum, demonstrating the apparent synonymous nature of the traits despite varying degrees of severity in expression. The current factorial structure of introversion demonstrates how autistic features interact to produce the personality dimension. Other factors, including genetic predisposition, relationships to the clinical and non-clinical symptoms of schizophrenia spectrum expression, and neurological findings that support the correlation will be considered. Finally, suggestions for future research and possible theoretical and empirical implications and applications are explored.

http://etd.fcla.edu/CF/CFE0003090/Gr..._201005_MA.pdf
Kon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2010, 09:56 AM   #2 (permalink)
 
odd_one_out's Avatar
 
Status: Your Assumptions
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 7,027



Default

I'm only on page 56.
odd_one_out is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2011, 11:32 PM   #3 (permalink)
 
Hangman's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Dec 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 63



Default

definetly not reading 156 pages, but it does seem that introversion and autism correlate, seems there are many more autistics then we thought.
Hangman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2011, 11:33 PM   #4 (permalink)
 
Under17's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: May 2010
Age: 25
Posts: 808



Default

Cliff notes please.
Under17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2011, 11:38 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
King Moonracer's Avatar
 
Status: ENTP with SA...How?
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: central ny
Gender: Male
Age: 22
Posts: 2,404



Default

autistic people cant percieve social norms and society. I didnt reaad whatever you linked, but they are introverted probably because they dont know what the **** is going on. They are so much different from everyone and see the world in a completely different perspective. Aspergers is kinda the same but not nearly as bad.
King Moonracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2011, 12:04 AM   #6 (permalink)
Kon
 
Kon's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Toronto, Canada
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,811



Default

What I kinda like about some stuff in this paper is the author does point out some of the potential commonalities between ASD, introversion, HSP and SAD. This may suggest some common etiologies as also suggested in this paper:

Symptom overlap between autism spectrum disorder, generalized social anxiety disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder in adults: a preliminary case-controlled study.

"Patients with comorbid ASD differ from patients with pure OCD and SAD on autism-related problem behaviors, but there is also overlap between groups, possibly reflecting overlapping etiologies. Despite the relatively small sample size, these data strongly suggest that specific autism symptom domains should be assessed to pick up autism-related problems in OCD and SAD patients, and subsequently fine-tune treatment programs for these patients."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed
Kon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2011, 01:02 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
antonina's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Bay Area, CA
Gender: Female
Posts: 323



Default Extreme extroversion can also be a problem

I would also like to point out that extreme extroversion can be a problem also.
Extroverts tend to be impulsive and rarely think before acting:
Impulsivity, which Depue and Collins link to extraversion, can in its extreme case cause attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, pathological gambling, intermittent explosive disorder, kleptomania, pyromania, trichotillomania, self-mutilation, and sexual impulsivity, as well as borderline personality disorder, and antisocial personality disorder (4). Jennifer Greenberg and Eric Hollander, M.D., in their article "Brain Function and Impulsive Disorders" characterize impulsivity as "the failure to resist an impulse, drive or temptation that is harmful to oneself or others" (4). One can see why Depue and Collins see impulsivity as being linked with positive emotionality: this definition of impulsivity is almost the same as their definition of positive emotionality (more sensitivity to reward than punishment). The only addition is the inability to determine when the punishment outweighs the reward. According to Depue, "the extreme extrovert, then, is someone who has high dopamine reactivity and, as a result, easily binds rewarding cues to incentive motivation. That person will appear full of positive emotion and highly active in approaching rewarding stimuli and goals. The low extrovert will find it difficult to be so motivated and will require very strong stimuli to engage in rewarding activities" (6). It is interesting to consider that the same quality that in moderation is looked at as ambition, in excess is considered a failure to resist an impulse, drive or temptation that is harmful to oneself or others. Clearly, this extroversion/impulsivity/incentive motivation is a very influential trait which must be kept in balance to maintain emotional well-being.
antonina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2011, 04:26 AM   #8 (permalink)
 
sparky10's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: England , nw
Gender: Male
Posts: 389



Default

"Patients with comorbid ASD differ from patients with pure OCD and SAD on autism-related problem behaviors, but there is also overlap between groups, possibly reflecting overlapping etiologies

Can anyone provide a synopsis of the key points on how they differ and
how you tell them apart?
__________________
If no man is an island i will take the palm trees and sand.

I live as i choose or i will not live at all- cranberries
sparky10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2011, 08:52 AM   #9 (permalink)
Kon
 
Kon's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Toronto, Canada
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,811



Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sparky10 View Post
"Patients with comorbid ASD differ from patients with pure OCD and SAD on autism-related problem behaviors, but there is also overlap between groups, possibly reflecting overlapping etiologies

Can anyone provide a synopsis of the key points on how they differ and
how you tell them apart?
For SAD vs ASD, I found this diagram useful: I kinda feel that I have parts of both:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg UBijm.jpg (76.7 KB, 54 views)
Kon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2011, 01:14 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
sparky10's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: England , nw
Gender: Male
Posts: 389



Default

Thanks Kon

I still think i have aspects of both yet i have no problems understanding people, understanding social rules. How would sensory input be described and processing difficulties manifest themselves?
__________________
If no man is an island i will take the palm trees and sand.

I live as i choose or i will not live at all- cranberries
sparky10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2011, 02:54 PM   #11 (permalink)
Kon
 
Kon's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Toronto, Canada
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,811



Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sparky10 View Post
Thanks Kon

I still think i have aspects of both yet i have no problems understanding people, understanding social rules. How would sensory input be described and processing difficulties manifest themselves?

Asperger's tend to notice and pay attention to a lot of details in their surroundings and social stuff is very difficult when you think about it. I'm not sure if this an Aspie or a SAD thing but here's my problem with a dealing with a simple hug or kiss:

1. Am I supposed to hug this person?
2. When should I hug them or kiss them?
3. Am I supposed to use both hands or 1 hand?
4. Am I supposed to go on the left side or right side?
5. Do I kiss both sides or just one?
6. Should I actually touch them or just pretend to touch them with my lips?
7. They kinda smell. I don't feel like going near them. Will they get offended?
8. Why do we have to do these stupid things, it's so damn confusing?
9. I can tell I look clumsy, why do others look so natural at it?

etc.

This stuff goes around in my mind all the time and makes me anxious when I have to go to weddings, funerals, baptisms, parties, etc. Also, I'm never sure what I'm supposed to say and then I have to watch that I don't say something that they might find offensive, etc. I hate formal socializations because the rules are very difficult to pick up. They seem to be a bit "fake" and/or artificial. I also hate not being able to swear or use "bad" words. I often get adults who are much younger than me tell me to watch my language, in front of kids, etc. I was always considered socially inept by my friends. I assumed that this was SAD but the distinction between SAD and Asperger's-related social anxiety seems like a very difficult one for me to differentiate. Maybe someone else can shed some light. I kinda go and forth from this forum and some Aspie forums and despite reading tons of stuff on it, it still seems very difficult to tell the difference. Maybe it's simple and I can't understand it. I'm not sure?
Kon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2011, 03:55 PM   #12 (permalink)
 
sparky10's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: England , nw
Gender: Male
Posts: 389



Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kon View Post
Asperger's tend to notice and pay attention to a lot of details in their surroundings and social stuff is very difficult when you think about it. I'm not sure if this an Aspie or a SAD thing but here's my problem with a dealing with a simple hug or kiss:

1. Am I supposed to hug this person?
2. When should I hug them or kiss them?
3. Am I supposed to use both hands or 1 hand?
4. Am I supposed to go on the left side or right side?
5. Do I kiss both sides or just one?
6. Should I actually touch them or just pretend to touch them with my lips?
7. They kinda smell. I don't feel like going near them. Will they get offended?
8. Why do we have to do these stupid things, it's so damn confusing?
9. I can tell I look clumsy, why do others look so natural at it?

etc.

This stuff goes around in my mind all the time and makes me anxious when I have to go to weddings, funerals, baptisms, parties, etc. Also, I'm never sure what I'm supposed to say and then I have to watch that I don't say something that they might find offensive, etc. I hate formal socializations because the rules are very difficult to pick up. They seem to be a bit "fake" and/or artificial. I also hate not being able to swear or use "bad" words. I often get adults who are much younger than me tell me to watch my language, in front of kids, etc. I was always considered socially inept by my friends. I assumed that this was SAD but the distinction between SAD and Asperger's-related social anxiety seems like a very difficult one for me to differentiate. Maybe someone else can shed some light. I kinda go and forth from this forum and some Aspie forums and despite reading tons of stuff on it, it still seems very difficult to tell the difference. Maybe it's simple and I can't understand it. I'm not sure?
Heres my take on it with the hug situation:-

If i was to hug someone the factors would be:-

Would this person want to be hugged?
The timing of the hug so as to not cause awkwardness?
If i was hugged and felt anxious then would i look anxious to others
and would they notice this, do i look awkward hugging this person?
In a formal situation this is hard because it varys as some people are touchy feely and others not tactile atall so it is tough to initiate wheras its easier to receive one.

In these situations i dont worry about saying something offensive as i would realise what might offend that person. They seem fake and artificial because they are so this makes socialising hard because its more of a judgemental atmosphere and everyone is trying to impress imo.
I dont have the swearing probs as i know it wouldnt be appropiate in that situation.
The problem is i like routine to a large extent and get anxiety if things change. In groups i find my listening skills go and feel kind of confused , dazed. If i get stressed my social skills become worse, and i hate feeling nervous as it overwhelms me. Im selfconcious a lot and analyse what i think and do all the time.
Ive been looking into this a lot and find im erring to more social phobia but it does seem more than that as sa doesnt define how much it affects me to such a large extent.
__________________
If no man is an island i will take the palm trees and sand.

I live as i choose or i will not live at all- cranberries
sparky10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2011, 03:56 PM   #13 (permalink)
 
odd_one_out's Avatar
 
Status: Your Assumptions
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 7,027



Default

The differences in AS-related social anxiety have not been studied, from what I've seen. Attwood (in his Complete Guide to ... book) summarises his clinical observations but doesn't go into depth and is unconvincing.

Quote:
How would sensory input be described and processing difficulties manifest themselves?
Off the top of my head: Differences in sensory perception in autism are found in all modalities. Perception can be more acute meaning the person is hypersensitive to stimuli. They might require earplugs, sunglasses, and loose clothing for instance. When overwhelmed by stimuli, i.e. overloaded, it can result in shutdown or meltdown. Shutdown can involve freezing in position, being unable to think your way out the situation, and being unable to process or use speech. Meltdown can involve complete loss of control. For instance, collapsing, screaming, self-harm, and sobbing. Overload without these can involve all processing and thought slowing down and being delayed, extreme fatigue, spacing out, nausea. All kinds of symptoms. Often you don't realise you're overloaded or do when it's too late and you're near/in shutdown or meltdown.

Processing difficulties can involve problems filtering out background noise and certain sound frequencies. Many have auditory processing deficits where they cannot distinguish speech sounds well in noisy environments. Much of this is also due to problems with attention and attention-switching.

Focus is very narrow and detail-oriented. That is, there is a local processing bias - a preference for detail over gestalt. This is an important basis for talent, along with systemising (see this study).
odd_one_out is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2011, 04:22 PM   #14 (permalink)
 
sparky10's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: England , nw
Gender: Male
Posts: 389



Default

Thanks odd one out

The therapist i see said i could have autistic traits and wouldnt rule out aspergers so i am unsure. She said my thinking is obsessive , ritualised but i have to think this way to be able to cope with life. Otherwise anxiety would become unbearable in certain situations.

Processing difficulties can involve problems filtering out background noise and certain sound frequencies. Many have auditory processing deficits where they cannot distinguish speech sounds well in noisy environments. Much of this is also due to problems with attention and attention-switching.( i experience this and find it v.hard to concentrate on more than one conversation in group setting and also b.ground noise can leave me unable to filter or concentrate on main focus).

Focus is very narrow and detail-oriented. That is, there is a local processing bias - a preference for detail over gestalt. This is an important basis for talent, along with systemising ( This is hard to say as i dont know to what extent is narrow but i am definetely detail orientated)

I dont experience meltdown only rarely in my life and it is more cognitive/ breakdown psychologically but i do get overload characteristics but i am aware of them when i am having them.
__________________
If no man is an island i will take the palm trees and sand.

I live as i choose or i will not live at all- cranberries
sparky10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2011, 05:48 PM   #15 (permalink)
Kon
 
Kon's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Toronto, Canada
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,811



Default

I found this interesting:

Question by Fred M.: Shyness and Asperger’s disorder: similarities and differences?

A while back, an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal called Asperger’s disorder “a pompous label for shyness”. While perhaps going a bit far, I think it highlights a point: there are a number of similarities between people with (mild) Asperger’s and people with shyness/social anxiety. While the standard issue answer to this question is, “Aspergers don’t know how to interact, shy people do but are freaked out”, one should consider that lack of social skills is widely reported in the literature on social anxiety and avoidant personality disorder. Many shy people withdraw for so many years that they lose the opportunity to develop social skills. Thus, they can’t maintain a conversation, awkward silences, may be socially immature and underdeveloped, be withdrawn…just like people with Asperger’s disorder.

Except in extreme cases, where the person in question is literally obsessed with some archaic topic, talks at people endlessly about said topic, has sensory issues, takes everything extremely literally and can not make generalizations, I would say social phobia/AvPD is almost always the more appropriate diagnosis. My feeling is a lot of people these days in the Social Phobia/Avoidant ballpark are misdiagnosed as Asperger’s because it is a “trendy” diagnosis and the outward appearance can be so similar. I am especially skeptical about those online who claim to have Asperger’s yet seldom ever mention any other symptom than the usual “I’m XX years old and never had a girlfriend.” To me, that’s classic Avoidant Personality, not Asperger’s, except if there are fairly clear-cut autistic traits accompanying it.

Am I wrong here? Am I off base? I think what I’m saying is fairly reasonable, and I wish people on the internet would stop calling themselves “Aspies” because they are introverts or experience a mild and very normal level of social awkwardness that would disappear if they stepped away from the computer for a few minutes. I’m actually glad Asperger’s is being dropped from the DSM-V and being merged into Autism Spectrum Disorder. This way, the people really afflicted with it will still qualify for an ASD diagnosis, and the shy, introverted nerds will no longer have an excuse for being a social shut-in and will actually maybe grow a pair and start…gasp! talking to girls…

http://www.banishinganxiety.com/anxi...nd-differences
Kon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2011, 07:21 PM   #16 (permalink)
Kon
 
Kon's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Toronto, Canada
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,811



Default

Sometimes, I think if you're embarrassed of having SAD and prefer to have Asperger's then you probably have SAD. I can't see how someone with Asperger's would be embarassed about having SAD but I can see how someone with SAD being embarrassed/ashamed about having SAD. Is this a stupid argument/claim?
Kon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 04:55 AM   #17 (permalink)
 
odd_one_out's Avatar
 
Status: Your Assumptions
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 7,027



Default

^ In general this might be so because autists are generally less aware of norms and more individual, but many with AS might be embarrassed of having SAD due to having rigid ideas about it, enough social awareness, and the SAD itself (i.e. fearing judgement by others). Do you think it's a common reason people with SAD self-diagnose AS? When people are embarrassed about having SAD it usually seems to be because they want to fit in and be normal, so I reckon they'd also be embarrassed about AS and probably more so.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sparky10 View Post
She said my thinking is obsessive , ritualised but i have to think this way to be able to cope with life. Otherwise anxiety would become unbearable in certain situations.
That's postulated to be one reason autists have obsessive, ritualised behaviour. The difference between such behaviours in the course of anxiety disorders such as SAD and autism may be mostly one of degree and history. For instance, in the DSM the degree required to meet the AS repetitive behaviour/interest criteria involves the routines and special interests being a source of considerable disability - they disrupt daily functioning and socialising - and they have a history in childhood. But also the interests in AS may differ in quality too, being more circumscribed. Checking out the expanded text in the DSM helps explain the list of criteria.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sparky10 View Post
i experience this and find it v.hard to concentrate on more than one conversation in group setting and also b.ground noise can leave me unable to filter or concentrate on main focus.
I do too. Auditory processing troubles have also been found in SAD. The trouble is there are areas of overlap like this (and in being detail-oriented) between the conditions and a high level of autistic traits in some with SAD is possible, which should be taken into account during treatment.

When considering criteria involving traits such as detail-orientation it's best to investigate the degree. For instance if there's persistent preoccupation with parts of objects (which could in high-functioning adults be described as preoccupation with aspects of systems), does it interfere with other functions and tasks? E.g. did it make schoolwork much harder because you didn't know how to answer in general terms? Do you lose sight of important tasks that need attention such as eating and bathing? Do you become absorbed/hyperfocused for hours at a time and can't switch tasks? Is there evidence for particular talents based on detail-orientation, especially higher than your general abilities - e.g. exceptional drawing skills, distinguishing pitch, collecting information, and understanding systems? Studying how such traits as detail-orientation manifest and the degree to which they're considered significant will help determine how much the criteria apply.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sparky10 View Post
I dont experience meltdown only rarely in my life and it is more cognitive/ breakdown psychologically but i do get overload characteristics but i am aware of them when i am having them.
This is all possible in ASD. Many with Asperger's don't get meltdowns.
odd_one_out is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 06:32 AM   #18 (permalink)
 
sparky10's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: England , nw
Gender: Male
Posts: 389



Default

In general this might be so because autists are generally less aware of norms and more individual, but many with AS might be embarrassed of having SAD due to having rigid ideas about it, enough social awareness, and the SAD itself (i.e. fearing judgement by others). Do you think it's a common reason people with SAD self-diagnose AS? When people are embarrassed about having SAD it usually seems to be because they want to fit in and be normal, so I think they'd also be embarrassed about AS and probably more so.


I agree with this i dont think you can say per se that someone with AS would not be embarrased to have sad as the point above underlines.
I do not think a diagnosis of AS would benefit someone with SAD and it would probably be more of a stigma for them in the way society looks at
or judges the condition.


Thanks for the explanations odd one out it is becoming clearer in my
mind the differences between the conditions and how they affect you.
__________________
If no man is an island i will take the palm trees and sand.

I live as i choose or i will not live at all- cranberries
sparky10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 04:00 PM   #19 (permalink)
Kon
 
Kon's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Toronto, Canada
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,811



Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by odd_one_out View Post
Do you think it's a common reason people with SAD self-diagnose AS?
I don't know what to believe anymore but I did suspect it with myself. I didn't want to believe I had SAD. I self-diagnosed myself with it after 10 years or so of trying to fit in after my failure in university and then my psychiatrists gave me the diagnosis and prescribed clonazepam. But I ended up abusing it and narcotics.

But more recently no-one including my psychiatrist think I have SAD. My psychiatrist thinks I have GAD while my best friend who is active in the ASD community as his kid is affected by moderate autism is convinced I have ASD (Asperger's). He's known me for over 20 years. But either than driving my parents crazy with 1000s of question/day about everything, major sensory issues and narrow obsessive interests, I didn't have any other ASD traits when I was younger (e.g. communicating with peers, other minds, etc.), as far as I can remember.

For whatever reason if I think to myself, I have ASD instead of SAD, it feels like I'm just looking for an easy way out/explanation for my anxiety. I know it's stupid but it just feels that way
Kon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 05:29 PM   #20 (permalink)
 
sparky10's Avatar
 
Status: SAS Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: England , nw
Gender: Male
Posts: 389



Default

I was diagnosed myself with GAD by a pdoc and secondary depression and
thats all the diagnoses i have had. Yet i know for a fact i have generalised social anxiety which has worsened in the last two years.
In the uk pdocs seem reluctant to give a diagnoses of SAD whether it is because it is one of the newer disorders or they do not know how to treat it aswell as something like GAD.
Kon do you find like me SAD doesnt adequately describe yourself, i am coming to the belief that i may have autistic traits yet not aspergers and
thats why nothing seems to fit.
__________________
If no man is an island i will take the palm trees and sand.

I live as i choose or i will not live at all- cranberries
sparky10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
introversion as a disorder? mjhea0 Frustration 11 11-23-2010 10:10 PM
Introversion Marci07 Coping With Social Anxiety 11 02-23-2010 10:12 PM
Introversion? rawrguy Coping With Social Anxiety 7 04-03-2009 10:42 PM
S.A. or Introversion? onedimension Coping With Social Anxiety 1 03-27-2009 09:25 PM
Introversion and SA. silentline General Discussion 4 02-23-2009 03:31 PM

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:32 AM.
Powered by vBulletin® ©2000-2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc. User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.