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Old 08-25-2011, 04:12 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Default Possible tolerance prevention for dexedrine/adderall?

I am on dexedrine and take 10mg since I started and still am on 10mg a day (spansule). I take 600mg of lithium a day too and I have read some studies showing how nmda receptor antagonists can stop or prevent tolerance to stimulants like dexedrine or adderall. There have been studies showing that lithium has nmda receptor blocking effects too.
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anyone know if lithium can be helping my tolerance to the dexedrine I am on. I took it a few years back when I wasn't on lithium and I was on 30mg a day and still no better benefit.
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Old 08-25-2011, 10:09 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
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Memantine is supposed to help with tolerance to adderall. Of course you have to get it prescribed first and also have to see if you can put up with any side effects you might get.

DXM is also said to help with tolerance to adderall, I personally don't feel too comfortable taking DXM on a daily basis while taking an SSRI due to the possibility of serotonin syndrome.

Chelated Magnesium is also supposed to help. I started taking this and actually find it helpful for sleep. Not sure if it has helped with tolerance at all, but great sleep aid.
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Old 08-26-2011, 09:43 AM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Memantine is supposed to help with tolerance to adderall. Of course you have to get it prescribed first and also have to see if you can put up with any side effects you might get.

DXM is also said to help with tolerance to adderall, I personally don't feel too comfortable taking DXM on a daily basis while taking an SSRI due to the possibility of serotonin syndrome.

Chelated Magnesium is also supposed to help. I started taking this and actually find it helpful for sleep. Not sure if it has helped with tolerance at all, but great sleep aid.
Yeah I don't want to ask my doctor for memantine to help tolerance not adding another drug. DXM forget that .. wouldn't use that either. Magnesium glycinate 500-750mg at night I take helps a bit. BTW I'm on a low dose of zoloft so DXM would be a no for that reason as well
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Old 08-26-2011, 02:18 PM   #4 (permalink)
 
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Definitely go with acamprosate, memantine, or both. Dosage and timing, all that stuff is basically up to you to discover, there's so many different ways to approach this I wouldn't even know where to begin. But I think 40 mg memantine a day and 1332 mg of acamprosate is the most recommended, or something like that. I haven't got my acamprosate yet so I don't know all about it. You can get either one without a prescription from certain Indian online pharmacies, some of them open all day, and have reliable chemists. It's semi-legal in US and probably no one cares much about it in Canada but I could be wrong.

Oh and curcumin too I would take.
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Old 08-26-2011, 04:29 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
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Yeah I don't want to ask my doctor for memantine to help tolerance not adding another drug. DXM forget that .. wouldn't use that either. Magnesium glycinate 500-750mg at night I take helps a bit. BTW I'm on a low dose of zoloft so DXM would be a no for that reason as well
Wow that's a lot of magnesium lol. I only take 300mg of supplemental magnesium at night time, especially since I looked up the max amount of supplemental magnesium a person should take a day is 350mg (office of dietary supplement site, I think it was).

Does magnesium help you sleep as well?
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Old 08-27-2011, 01:09 AM   #6 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Memantine is supposed to help with tolerance to adderall. Of course you have to get it prescribed first and also have to see if you can put up with any side effects you might get.

DXM is also said to help with tolerance to adderall, I personally don't feel too comfortable taking DXM on a daily basis while taking an SSRI due to the possibility of serotonin syndrome.

Chelated Magnesium is also supposed to help. I started taking this and actually find it helpful for sleep. Not sure if it has helped with tolerance at all, but great sleep aid.
Quote:
You can get either one without a prescription from certain Indian online pharmacies, some of them open all day, and have reliable chemists. It's semi-legal in US and probably no one cares much about it in Canada but I could be wrong.
Both of these suggestions pretty much give you the best methods to prevent further tolerance/possibly reverse it and a means by which you can obtain the necessary materials. I'm sure it shouldn't be too hard to find an online source for anything you cannot get OTC, and being in Canada only makes it more likely you may find a domestic source online.
Personally I know a pretty decent site that actually offers a decent range of both z-benzos and benzodiazepines, ritalin, tramadol etc. Not all of them are indian. Aside from getting pharms to assist your cause, there are alternative chemicals you could consider as well. Be careful about which you use, don't wanna get scammed or worse.

Aside from using tolerance prevention strategies you could always find a substitute for dexedrine that you can use basically so that you are able to take vacations/periods of abstinence from using dexamphetamine, helping add to your tolerance. The key here would be to incorporate the memantine and other tolerance reduction methods into use while using a substitute stimulant that will not exhibit a very strong cross tolerance/perhaps has a different mechanism of action since amp isi primarily a DA releaser that prevents reuptake via some monoamine effect. A typical dopamine/norepinepherine reuptake inhibitor perhaps at more mild doses since you wanna assure you dont incite cross tolerance.
I couldn't really say what you should use if you chose this, I am certainly no licensed doctor and I wouldn't tell you should do anything that may be in conflict with your ethics or the law. I know ephedra is often something I've heard of college students using to study with. Not sure if ephedra is legal. I looked up this link for you, discussing modafinal and dex for purposes like yours and even asks about nmda antagonism for both. You may be able to get modafinal/nuvigil from your doc, if not the online pharmacies may carry adrafinal, the prodrug of modafinal that you dont need a script for

There are a few classes of chemicals that would work for this purpose, some belonging to phenethylamine classes like amphetamine, also there are cathinone family drugs that may suite you're needs for example Wellbutrin, piperidines like ritalin, "wakefullness enhancers" like modafinal or its legal prodrug adrafinal, pyrovalerones...the list goes on, but the classes are ones you can do some research on to see if there are any chemicals that meet your criteria.
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Currently Rx'd daily:
Adderall IR 20mg x 3, Clonazepam 1mg x 2, hydroxyzine 25mg x 3, Suboxone 8mg x 2, *I've managed to taper down to about 2mg IV/instranasal
Currently often making cameo appearances
4-Fluoroamphetamine. GBL, 2c-i
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Old 08-27-2011, 01:13 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Here is an excerpt that I feel successfully explains and informs people about the general concept of nmda antagonism and amphetamine/drug tolerance and gives them multiple options with thorough explanations of each
Quote:
Almost everyone's opinion on using speed/amphetamine/meth is that the best highs were the first two (or three). That is also the case with me.
When I first tried speed I've used very small amount (I'd say it was around 50 mg) of rather pure amphetamine and damn, it was the best day of my life :] I remember that I was euphoric for around 12 hours, I couldn't stop talking, the music sounded extremely well, I was full of motivation and never felt better in my whole life. Afterwards I had no comedown.
My second attempt wasn't as fantastic, but also wonderful. Since then I've never achieved that extremely euphoric sensation with my head tingling from pleasure and my insides screaming "DAMN I FEEL ****ING AWESOME!!!". After a year of my speed usage and trying doses even four times as high as the 1st amount I tried - I never came close to that feeling. Sure, I can be motivated, energetic, have a great time during the tweak, be very sociable, but it is still not like during the first two times. I'm aware that amphetamine tolerance develops very quickly and stays at that level for a long period of time (even when taking breaks), so lately I've been doing some online reading on that subject.

Amphetamine tolerance is caused by excess Ca++ influx through the NMDA receptor gated calcium channels on the outer membranes of the dopamine cells bodies in the ventral tegental area, one of two areas in the brain with concentrations of dopamine producing neurons.
As alluded to above, taking an appropriate NMDA (partial) antagonist will prevent the development of a tolerance for the effects of an amphetamine or amphetamine-like stimulant. Also, by preventing excess Ca++ influx into the neuron, an NMDA antagonist will prevent associated brain alterations and damage (excitotoxicity).

Studies have indicated that amphetamine tolerance is prevented by exogenous or endogenous agents that are able to inhibit excess Ca++ influx into the neuron through the gated calcium channels on the neuronal membrane that have NMDA subtype glutamate receptors.Glutamate , the body’s major excitatory neurotransmitter, opens the gated calcium ion channels upon attaching to the NMDA receptor. A number of other receptors are also expressed on these calcium channels, which, when stimulated, either facilitate or inhibit glutamate’s action.

It is also important that agents that inhibit calcium channel activity not also cause deficient Ca++ influx. For example, ketamine is a full NMDA receptor antagonist, that prevents excess Ca++ influx and amphetamine tolerance. But being a full NMDA antagonist, ketamine in excessive doses results in deficient Ca++ influx. This could be one of the reasons it leaves K-user in a state of disassociation.

So basically we have following NDMA antagonists:
1. Memantine (Akatinol/Axura)
2. Acamprosate (Campral)
3. Amantadine (Symmetrel/Amantix)
4. Magnesium (supplement)
5. Dextrometorphan/DXM
6. Ketamine
7. PCP
(funny that 5,6,7 are recreational drugs)

Two of them have minimal (or none) side effects and have been identified (and verified by one anecdotal person, which has been taking amphetamine-type stimulants and NDMA antagonist with same beneficial effects for a period of 2 years) as preventing amphetamine tolerance: 1) Memantine and 2) Acamprosate.

1) Memantine is a partial NMDA antagonist that effectively puts an upper limit on Ca++ influx without compromising healthy levels of Ca++ influx. Memantine is not available in the US at this time. It is in stage 3 trials for Alzheimer’s disease. US approval may come within the next 2 years. Memantine is now approved in the European Union for the treatment of Alzheimer’s. It has been marketed in Germany since 1978 for the treatment of dementia and other cognitive disorders. It comes in 10mg tablets. One or two tablets/day are sufficient to prevent amphetamine tolerance, overactivity of the NMDA receptor and consequent free radical stress inside the neuron. The most expensive option though.

2) Acamprosate (n-acetyl-homo-taurine) analogue of the amino acid taurine. Alternatively, it may be termed as a carrier molecule for taurine, that allows taurine to readily cross the blood brain barrier, unlike taurine itself. Taurine is a NMDA receptor antagonist. Acamprosate is an investigational drug in the US, undergoing stage 2 (?) trials for the treatment of alcoholics. It is available in most European countries as a treatment for alcoholism, with great efficiacy. Cheaper than memantine, however efficiacy should be the same.

3) Amantadine, originally used in the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza infection and drug-induced Parkinsonism, also blocks NMDA receptors. Besides it is beneficial in traumatic head injury, dementia, multiple sclerosis,cocaine withdrawal and depression. Amantadine appears to act through several pharmacological mechanisms, none of which have been identified as the one chief mode of action. It is a dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic substance, blocks monoaminoxidase A and NMDA receptors, and seems to raise beta-endorphin/beta-lipotropin levels. I couldn't find what amount of the drug should be used to block NDMA. Cheaper than Acamprosate. No one has tested it yet, but I think it would be a good choice.

4) Magnesium is also an NMDA antagonist. Most people are deficient in magnesium, and stress reduces magnesium levels. Whether or not one takes amphetamines, magnesium supplementation is very important for mood, general well-being and keeping stress levels under control. It is also important to take magnesium in efficient form, with adequate bioavailability. The best type is magnesium glycinate (chelated) with bioavailability at around 80%. Second best is magnesium carbonate with (I don't remember exactly) bioavailability at little above 30%. Supplemented magnesium should be at 500 mg/day level. Also there is a study which shows that children who use amphetamine-type stimulants have bad magnesium/calcium balance. Calcium levels stay the same with amphetamine usage, but magnesium levels drop.

5) DXM - definitely the cheapest option of all NDMA antagonists, but I'd rather use Memantine or Acamprosate. Although, I've heard anecdotes that doses as low as 70 mg/day are enough to block NDMA - I couldn't find those amounts in abstracts/studies.

6) and 7) I wouldn't use as an amphetamine tolerance prevention. Ketamine for its known effects (you wouldn't want to be in a K-hole during the tweak just for the sake of prevention tolerance)
PCP - this one doesn't need explanation. It has nasty side-effects and I've mentioned it just because it is a NDMA antagonist. I wouldn't touch it even if it was dirt cheap.
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Currently Rx'd daily:
Adderall IR 20mg x 3, Clonazepam 1mg x 2, hydroxyzine 25mg x 3, Suboxone 8mg x 2, *I've managed to taper down to about 2mg IV/instranasal
Currently often making cameo appearances
4-Fluoroamphetamine. GBL, 2c-i
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Old 08-27-2011, 07:22 AM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Echonnector View Post
Both of these suggestions pretty much give you the best methods to prevent further tolerance/possibly reverse it and a means by which you can obtain the necessary materials. I'm sure it shouldn't be too hard to find an online source for anything you cannot get OTC, and being in Canada only makes it more likely you may find a domestic source online.
Personally I know a pretty decent site that actually offers a decent range of both z-benzos and benzodiazepines, ritalin, tramadol etc. Not all of them are indian. Aside from getting pharms to assist your cause, there are alternative chemicals you could consider as well. Be careful about which you use, don't wanna get scammed or worse.

Aside from using tolerance prevention strategies you could always find a substitute for dexedrine that you can use basically so that you are able to take vacations/periods of abstinence from using dexamphetamine, helping add to your tolerance. The key here would be to incorporate the memantine and other tolerance reduction methods into use while using a substitute stimulant that will not exhibit a very strong cross tolerance/perhaps has a different mechanism of action since amp isi primarily a DA releaser that prevents reuptake via some monoamine effect. A typical dopamine/norepinepherine reuptake inhibitor perhaps at more mild doses since you wanna assure you dont incite cross tolerance.
I couldn't really say what you should use if you chose this, I am certainly no licensed doctor and I wouldn't tell you should do anything that may be in conflict with your ethics or the law. I know ephedra is often something I've heard of college students using to study with. Not sure if ephedra is legal. I looked up this link for you, discussing modafinal and dex for purposes like yours and even asks about nmda antagonism for both. You may be able to get modafinal/nuvigil from your doc, if not the online pharmacies may carry adrafinal, the prodrug of modafinal that you dont need a script for

There are a few classes of chemicals that would work for this purpose, some belonging to phenethylamine classes like amphetamine, also there are cathinone family drugs that may suite you're needs for example Wellbutrin, piperidines like ritalin, "wakefullness enhancers" like modafinal or its legal prodrug adrafinal, pyrovalerones...the list goes on, but the classes are ones you can do some research on to see if there are any chemicals that meet your criteria.
Thanks, I think breaks will be the best help for me. I'm not looking to add anything else right now. Yes ephedra is available where I live. Ephedrine comes in 8mg tablets in bottles of 50 (cheap too under 10 bucks) and there is no set number of bottles you can buy. Tried it before and actually found it to be good stuff! definetly going to give that stuff a try again on breaks!
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Old 08-27-2011, 07:27 AM   #9 (permalink)
 
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Wow that's a lot of magnesium lol. I only take 300mg of supplemental magnesium at night time, especially since I looked up the max amount of supplemental magnesium a person should take a day is 350mg (office of dietary supplement site, I think it was).

Does magnesium help you sleep as well?
Yes magnesium definetly helps me sleep it's great stuff
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Old 08-28-2011, 01:07 AM   #10 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Echonnector View Post
There are a few classes of chemicals that would work for this purpose, some belonging to phenethylamine classes like amphetamine, also there are cathinone family drugs that may suite you're needs for example Wellbutrin, piperidines like ritalin, "wakefullness enhancers" like modafinal or its legal prodrug adrafinal, pyrovalerones...the list goes on, but the classes are ones you can do some research on to see if there are any chemicals that meet your criteria.
That's a pretty broad suggestion for drug substitutions. I tried doing some research but there are literally a hundred+ drugs that fall under these classes. Any more specific suggestions?
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Old 08-30-2011, 02:43 PM   #11 (permalink)
 
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That's a pretty broad suggestion for drug substitutions. I tried doing some research but there are literally a hundred+ drugs that fall under these classes. Any more specific suggestions?
Of course, the problem that comes up then is availability/legality of the substitutions you seek. If you want a more comprehensive list I'd suggest having a private chat with someone that may be able to discuss sensitive information in a more secure form of communication
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Currently Rx'd daily:
Adderall IR 20mg x 3, Clonazepam 1mg x 2, hydroxyzine 25mg x 3, Suboxone 8mg x 2, *I've managed to taper down to about 2mg IV/instranasal
Currently often making cameo appearances
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Old 09-03-2011, 02:07 PM   #12 (permalink)
 
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If memantine is too hard to get, lithium may (with a big questionmark) work due to its upregulation of D2 receptors in the striatum.
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Effects of lithium on dopamine D2 receptor expression in the rat brain striatum.
Kameda K, Miura J, Suzuki K, Kusumi I, Tanaka T, Koyama T.
Source
Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan. kenkamed@med.hokudai.ac.jp
Abstract
Effects of lithium on the dopamine D2 receptor expression in the rat brain striatum were studied. Feeding the chow containing 0.2% LiCO3 for 6 days increased the level of the dopamine D2 receptor mRNA, and the transcription rate of the dopamine D2 receptor gene, indicating the stimulatory effects of lithium on the transcription of the dopamine D2 receptor gene. [3H] Spiperone binding to the striatal membranes increased in the rats treated with lithium, while the Western blotting analysis showed no change of the amount of the dopamine D2 receptors. These results suggested that lithium might induce the conformational changes of the dopamine D2 receptors. The methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity was enhanced by the pretreatment with lithium, whereas simultaneous increase in the methamphetamine concentration in the striatum was also observed. These observations suggested that the stimulation of methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity by lithium might be, at least partly, due to either increased sensitivity of the dopamine receptors, or increased concentration of methamphetamine in brain, or combination of both.
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Old 09-03-2011, 02:09 PM   #13 (permalink)
 
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Here is an excerpt that I feel successfully explains and informs people about the general concept of nmda antagonism and amphetamine/drug tolerance and gives them multiple options with thorough explanations of each
That stuff was posted on bluelight years ago i dont really agree with their explanation tough.
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Old 09-03-2011, 02:19 PM   #14 (permalink)
 
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I am on dexedrine and take 10mg since I started and still am on 10mg a day (spansule). I take 600mg of lithium a day too and I have read some studies showing how nmda receptor antagonists can stop or prevent tolerance to stimulants like dexedrine or adderall. There have been studies showing that lithium has nmda receptor blocking effects too.
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http://jop.sagepub.com/content/24/4/585.abstract
anyone know if lithium can be helping my tolerance to the dexedrine I am on. I took it a few years back when I wasn't on lithium and I was on 30mg a day and still no better benefit.
Magnesium is good for tolerance. It keeps it it yor system longer longer too. Supposedly cheleated magnesium is bad though. The best is Magnesium Glycinate, I just got some it is good.

This link talks about a lot of ways to prevent neurotoxicity from ampohetamines. Skip through the first posts if you want. I'm thinking turmeric (curcumin), CoQ10, and magnesium will be good for me.

The one thing I'm unclear about is that magnesium is considered a NMDA receptor antagonist! All of the other substances in this category are harmful to the brain so I don't see how magnesium isn't too. I'm probably way off on this, but from what I understand only 1/20 of the magnesium gets into your brain so that is what makes it safer than the others... I'm really not sure though, does anyone know?
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Old 09-03-2011, 02:21 PM   #15 (permalink)
 
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I was allways under the impression magnesium is too weak, any long term succes reports?
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Old 09-03-2011, 03:14 PM   #16 (permalink)
 
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Magnesium is good for tolerance. It keeps it it yor system longer longer too. Supposedly cheleated magnesium is bad though. The best is Magnesium Glycinate, I just got some it is good.
How is chelated magnesium bad? I take chelated magensium in the form of magnesium glycinate. I thought chelated was just supposed to mean more bio-availability.

Been taking magnesium past three weeks, don't know how well it works for tolerance, as I've only been on adderall for a month.

Haven't noticed a decrease in tolerance, so that's good. But I'm also a small dosage of 15mg daily.
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Old 09-03-2011, 03:34 PM   #17 (permalink)
 
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hmm... chelated glycinate should be be good. Here is the source I was talking about...

http://george-eby-research.com/html/...n-anxiety.html

Glutamate Toxicity

The worst mistake you can make is to use a magnesium compound called "magnesium amino acid chelate", or "chelated magnesium", or "magnesium chelate". Why? Many times these products are in fact magnesium glutamate or magnesium aspartate products and they will very likely make your depression worse. I don't know why laws exist to allow companies to label their products as a "chelate". That makes as much sense as labeling a product a "magnesium compound" or a "magnesium complex", since the words do not tell the full truth. I strongly suggest that you look over this list of legal aliases for the words "glutamate" or "aspartate".

chelate
glutamate
caseinate
textured protein
natural flavoring
yeast food
autolyzed yeast
hydrolyzed protein
hydrolyzed vegetable protein
yeast extract
hydrolyzed yeast
natural chicken or turkey flavoring
spices, and
modified food starch
Any time you find a magnesium compound that contains the above words in any kind of description, watch out! It will likely make you much more depressed than if you did nothing at all, since all of these words may (or may not) mean that glutamate and/or aspartate is the main ingredient in the product. The reason I bring this up is that a man from England bought and used a product labled "Magnesium Chelate" and got much sicker. This has also occured in the United States (very common) and Canada, and I suspect elsewhere too. When I researched it, I found the product to contain the magnesium complex of a modified food starch (glutamate). Needless to say, it made him much, much sicker. He barely survived since it very greatly worsened his depression and suicidal tendency. You have been warned as loudly as I can scream this warning! Here is more on glutamtate and aspartate.
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Old 09-03-2011, 03:55 PM   #18 (permalink)
 
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The one thing I'm unclear about is that magnesium is considered a NMDA receptor antagonist! All of the other substances in this category are harmful to the brain so I don't see how magnesium isn't too. I'm probably way off on this, but from what I understand only 1/20 of the magnesium gets into your brain so that is what makes it safer than the others... I'm really not sure though, does anyone know?
No no no.. In a nutshell..

The brain tries it's best to maintain homeostasis (chemical balance). When you introduce a drug (amphetamine), it throws off this balance. The brain has several mechanisms by which it becomes aware of imbalances such as this. In the case of neurotransmitters, ie dopamine and serotonin, this mechanism is an influx of Ca+ ions. These ions signal the brain to release less dopamine and serotonin, restoring the balance. NMDA antagonists indirectly block this influx of Ca+ ions via another mechanism (glutamate), but the result is that the brain is not "aware" of any chemical imbalance. Magnesium is just another NMDA antagonist, similar to Memantine, and is just as harmless.

The reason Memantine is effective in "treating" Alzheimers is that glutamate just happens to have implications in learning and memory. From what I understand (and I'm not sure about this), the brain eventually (in a matter of weeks) upregulates another chemical downstream of glutamate (or perhaps glutamate itself?), restoring learning and memory function to it's previous (and even enhancing it according to some), but leaves the inhibition of Ca+ ions in place, allowing for tolerance prevention.

But no, NMDA antagonists are not in the least a bad thing.
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Old 09-03-2011, 05:37 PM   #19 (permalink)
 
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hmm... chelated glycinate should be be good. Here is the source I was talking about...

http://george-eby-research.com/html/...n-anxiety.html
Thanks! Yeah it just seems like author was saying to avoid chelated magnesium, since most of them are magnesium aspartame or gluatmate, of course I only skimmed your post.

But yeah, I heard magnesium glycinate is one of the best forms of magnesium. Also great sleep aid for me lol.
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Old 09-03-2011, 05:47 PM   #20 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Opiman View Post
No no no.. In a nutshell..

The brain tries it's best to maintain homeostasis (chemical balance). When you introduce a drug (amphetamine), it throws off this balance. The brain has several mechanisms by which it becomes aware of imbalances such as this. In the case of neurotransmitters, ie dopamine and serotonin, this mechanism is an influx of Ca+ ions. These ions signal the brain to release less dopamine and serotonin, restoring the balance. NMDA antagonists indirectly block this influx of Ca+ ions via another mechanism (glutamate), but the result is that the brain is not "aware" of any chemical imbalance. Magnesium is just another NMDA antagonist, similar to Memantine, and is just as harmless.

The reason Memantine is effective in "treating" Alzheimers is that glutamate just happens to have implications in learning and memory. From what I understand (and I'm not sure about this), the brain eventually (in a matter of weeks) upregulates another chemical downstream of glutamate (or perhaps glutamate itself?), restoring learning and memory function to it's previous (and even enhancing it according to some), but leaves the inhibition of Ca+ ions in place, allowing for tolerance prevention.

But no, NMDA antagonists are not in the least a bad thing.

I don't understand how it isn't harmful according to this... Try to explain again. I need to put more thought into this.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NMDA_receptor_antagonist

So are you saying in the case of rasing any type of neroutransmitter, the brain releases Ca+ ions?

And I have a bad habit of reading user posts instead of scholarly sources but what do you think of this (the answer):

Q:
I heard here and on another set of forums magnesium was a nmda antagonist? I searched pubmed for 'magnesium nmda' and 'magnesium nmda antagonist' and found thousands of results, browsed a few pages randomly and found nothing.

Is this true?

I was also wondering if, being an nmda ant., it would potentiate opiates? I know DXM does, but does it due this because it's an nmda antagonist, or is some other method of action responsible for its potentiating opiates?

A:
"Well, yes. It's definatly true. But you can't really exploit that fact for recreational uses. Normally, your brain is under a very high level of Mg2+ blockade. Like, the concentration of Mg2+ needed to block 50% of NMDA receptor mediated currents is around the 20µM level. But in your brain, there's gonna be a concentration of around 1mM. So most of the channels are blocked by Mg2+.

The thing is, the Mg2+ NMDA receptor channel blockade is voltage dependent, so when ther neuron gets excited (depolarized), it kicks the Mg2+ out of the channel. But it can't kick Ketamine out, so thats why K gets you high and your magnesium multivitamin wont."
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