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Old 10-22-2007, 12:34 AM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Default Moving to a foreign country

does anyone have any experience with this? Can you please share your experiences?

I've known since a young age that I didn't want to live my life in America, or raise my children here. I either want to move to Europe (I lived in Ireland for 3 years when I was younger,) or move to Japan.

Europe wouldn't be so bad, cause at least I would blend in, but I think the whole Japan thing would be a ****ing huge undertaking. And I don't have a lot of means to get there, except teach English... but yeah, teaching and SA don't really go together.

Share your stories and thoughts!
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Old 10-22-2007, 01:01 AM   #2 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

http://www.gaijinsmash.net/

^that's a funny blog about a guy who's teaching English to middle school kids in Japan.

I've thought about moving to another country too...but I would never do it for my SA. First of all, I have ZERO marketable skills here in the U.S.--it would just be more impossible to get a job in some other country haha. Secondly, I just can't imagine any social environment in the US or otherwise making it easier for me to interact with people. If I can change at all, it would have to be some internal change in my thinking and behavior.
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Old 10-22-2007, 08:03 AM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

By moving to another state or country, the need for survival will overcome your social anxiety. I moved from baltimore to sante fe, nm for a year. I found I talked to strangers with no anxiety and socialized more than at home. At home, I am in my comfort zone and I avoid social situations because of the fear it generates.

Moving to a foreign country would pose tremendous challenges unless you plan to move to english speaking countries such as canada, uk or australia.

Moving out of your comfort zone will help reduce your SA, I think.
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Old 10-22-2007, 10:30 AM   #4 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

I'd find it easier to move to a non-english speaking country. At least, I find that when speaking another language, people don't notice my SA as much, maybe because I am concentrating so much more on remembering the words.

Anyway, isn't shyness considered a good trait in Japan? I'm not sure of this but I heard something like that, in which case it could be a good thing to try.
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Old 10-22-2007, 10:45 AM   #5 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

SA doesn't have to prevent people from teaching. What would likely happen is that you'd develop confidence and comfort in the teaching setting, while still facing SA in other situations outside that environment.

I've sadly never even left the country due to two opportunities falling through, against my will.
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Old 10-22-2007, 01:43 PM   #6 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

Honestly I wouldn't even mind, but my blushing is a big thing to me. I think I would stick out like a sore thumb. =x
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Old 10-22-2007, 02:35 PM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

DO NOT DO IT. I REPEAT DO NOT DO IT. I am an immigrant TO the united states and even though I was from Europe, I would never move anywhere else. If you move to Europe you will pay HUGE income tax because Eruope is being ruled by the socialist parties right now and it is not uncommon to see taxes of 40% or more. Universal health care is also common(bad bad thing). If you go to japan you will work crappy jobs, because you are not native. Nowhere in the world do you have as many opportunities as you do in here, please rethink this. If you do decide to move, at least you will have done so after a lot of consideration.
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Old 10-22-2007, 05:15 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

Guys! Save your political fighting for the Controversial forum.

If you want to feel comfortable and at home in a "foreign" country, move to Canada. Exact same culture and language, the only differences are that half of your income goes to taxes, everyone is a liberal (if you're not, they will call you "pro-American", a fate worse than death to some people here), and they use the metric system.

Also don't move to Japan, I hear that they are very racist there. Ditto to other parts of Asia and Africa, though I'd imagine that the main concern with racism in those areas would be people staring at you. Avoid eastern Europe and rural France, many people there don't like people who don't look like them.
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Old 10-22-2007, 06:03 PM   #9 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutnutnut
That's true. You can become a greedy business owner. Or you could you die in the street. Both extremes.
False dichotomy. There are multi, hundreds of millions of Americans who are in neither of these categories.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutnutnut
The US will become a toralitarian state, do you know why? Because it's ultimately the decision of the majority.
Why will the majority favor totalitarianism? Do you have polls or other forms of evidence to support this claim? Theorizing is not evidence.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutnutnut
A majority brainwashed by television, and not longer able of any critical or individual thinking.
I'm a strong proponent of critical thinking and opponent to most television programming, but it is premature to assume an outrageously extreme possibility is probable, let alone most probable or even certain.

Can you even name any Americans who are no longer capable of "any critical or individual thinking," let alone over 100-150 million Americans? This sounds like a neat script for a sci-fi movie, but it doesn't apply to reality.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutnutnut
You should be worried. Ever since 9/11, the americans have let their fear guide them, and let Bush do whatever he wants in the name of "security".
Again, this is too extreme a statement. Have you seen Bush's approval ratings lately? It's been abysmally low for many months now, and members of his own party are distancing themselves from him as a result (all politicians desire to be re-elected to survive politically).

While I'm certainly not a fan of Bush, it a slippery slope fallacy to assume that all of these remote possibilities will necessarily follow.

We all would like the voting public to pay more attention to educating themselves regarding the candidates, but you're actually underestimating the American people by your portraying them as a mostly brainwashed mass (or soon-to-be brainwashed mass) that desires a "totalitarian" government.

I sense your emotions are fueling these posts rather than reason and evidence.
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Old 10-22-2007, 06:42 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

I dont have quoting skills like some here, but I will just respond to all of you at once. Unless you have lived in another country, you have no idea how bad it is. The US might become a totalitarian state, but The European Union is doing that already at a much faster pace. I come from Poland, where there are NO opportunities and you know why? 80% of your income goes into taxes and the so called "free" health care which is a joke. Long lines, bad service. You make 100K you get 20 to live on...

Canada is not a good country to live in. I have family there. Their health care SUCKS donkey *** and it costs them a fortune, and it is certainly not free(you pay for it in taxes). Even stupid auto insurance goes up by 60% if you get a freaking ticket.

Another european countries that I have families in are Sweden and Germany. They get taxed so much that they can barely live on what they make. Europe is just becoming a bad place to live, with the European Union.

Stay in the country. I cannot stress this enough. If you think you have it bad here, you will not survive anywhere else.
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Old 10-22-2007, 08:52 PM   #11 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

Moving anywhere is a gamble, particularly when you have SA. I wouldn't move if it was an attempt to escape something inherently internal (like SA...). Try not to get discouraged by people's rhetoric though. Europe (and Canada) is no doubt more socialist than the US, but there are benefits (as well as the inevitable burden of higher taxes).
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Old 10-23-2007, 05:44 AM   #12 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

I'm living in a 3rd world country and it sucks. You guys should feel lucky living in well developed countries. My parents and older siblings have lived in America. My father is eager to migrate because of the bad living quality here but the others said it's not fun to live in other people's country.
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Old 10-23-2007, 08:05 AM   #13 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

I don't have time to read a novel's worth of material on a particular website, and it's not my responsibility to prove your points for you. The burden of proof is on the person making the claim, after all. I did look at each section though and browsed through many of the articles.

What I'm seeing is a conglomeration of singularly alarmist articles (primarily I sense an atmosphere of anti-media, anti-capitalism, anti-commercialism/corporations) without any commentary from a single dissenting opinion. Surely you recognize that numerous sources from multiple perspectives provides a more complete analysis of information than a single source. You're only getting a small piece of the picture if you're relying on this site for your world view. A site that claims that people "out there" have an agenda itself has an agenda.

Furthermore, I'm entirely confused as to what this website has to do with people being incapable of "any" critical thinking or "individual thinking." Why would a majority of Americans voluntarily vote for a totalitarian government? Do you have access to a scientifically conducted poll that asks Americans, "Do you favor a totalitarian government?" that shows a majority of assenting responses? If you don't have anything like this, I don't see how you can hold such a rigid, extreme view. Perhaps you can direct me to an article that addresses these statements I've referred to in this paragraph, rather than refer to a plethora of largely irrelevant articles, such as how media outlets sway polls.

This is not to say that the articles you've referred to represent 0% truth. It's merely to say that these articles are irrelevant to your above claim regarding a total lack of critical thinking and individual thinking among at least a majority, if not all Americans. You're now introducing new topics rather than sticking to the topic that I was addressing.

Rather than bite the bait (by agreeing or disagreeing with article contents), I'd rather simply ask again for evidence to support your specific claims.
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Old 10-24-2007, 04:58 PM   #14 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny1234
I dont have quoting skills like some here, but I will just respond to all of you at once. Unless you have lived in another country, you have no idea how bad it is. The US might become a totalitarian state, but The European Union is doing that already at a much faster pace. I come from Poland, where there are NO opportunities and you know why? 80% of your income goes into taxes and the so called "free" health care which is a joke. Long lines, bad service. You make 100K you get 20 to live on...

Canada is not a good country to live in. I have family there. Their health care SUCKS donkey *** and it costs them a fortune, and it is certainly not free(you pay for it in taxes). Even stupid auto insurance goes up by 60% if you get a freaking ticket.
i haven't had any problems with healthcare here, one time i had to wait three hours for a pioson ivy prescription, but so what, poison ivy is not important. Also you can always make an appiontment with a clinic if its somthing that can wait.

and your scraping the bottom of the barrel if your using car insurance as an example.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vicente
If you want to feel comfortable and at home in a "foreign" country, move to Canada. Exact same culture and language, the only differences are that half of your income goes to taxes, everyone is a liberal (if you're not, they will call you "pro-American", a fate worse than death to some people here), and they use the metric system.
a guy who likes bush is prime minister lol, and the metric system isn't that bad, i use both everyday. Only because the old farts still think the metric system is the tool of the devil and all our tools are in metric.
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Old 10-26-2007, 03:17 PM   #15 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

Im not saying canada is bad...its just not as good as the united states.
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Old 11-27-2007, 10:45 AM   #16 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

hello! I have social anxiety and I have lived in Japan for almost three years. Yes there are ups and downs and if you do not speak the language of course, you cannot get a good job. Like in america, if you cannot speak english, you cannot get a good job either. I do think that America has more opportunities as Japan can be so by the book if you know what I mean. However, its safer here and people are not as rude as in america. Yet at the same time, in america, i could talk to a perfect stranger when i wasnt shy and reach out if you know what I mean. In japan, they are so weird about communication and most of them are not really shy. In japan its weird how its cute to be shy. its irritating. I have social anxiety and when i teach , there are some days where I cannot stay in the room and talk with them..its just too much pressure and other days I have no problem. it comes and goes ...
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Old 11-27-2007, 02:24 PM   #17 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Moving to a foreign country

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomcoldaba
By moving to another state or country, the need for survival will overcome your social anxiety. I moved from baltimore to sante fe, nm for a year. I found I talked to strangers with no anxiety and socialized more than at home. At home, I am in my comfort zone and I avoid social situations because of the fear it generates.

Moving out of your comfort zone will help reduce your SA, I think.
Spot on Tom. I experienced the very same thing.
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Old 06-07-2011, 08:58 AM   #18 (permalink)
 
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I studied abroad in the Czech Republic for 6 months during college. I had a couple good friends with me so that made it easier, otherwise it would have a terrible experience since I didn't get along with the other 30 Americans who went with us. I had some serious social anxiety being around them, mainly because I didn't like them and I didn't want to go out and drink until 5am every single day. It's a tough thing to be that far away from anything you know, but it's a great experience. The problem with SAD and living abroad....you have no choice but to go out and talk to people - even if they don't speak English.

Most apartments in the Czech Republci didn't have a washer or dryer in them, and a laundry mat wasn't easy to find. Dry cleaning was the only other option - luckily we had a (small crappy semi broke) washer and a drying rack. Also, food doesn't keep as long there since they don't use as many preservatives. The fridge is usually smaller too, which doesn't really matter since without a car you can only carry so many bags back to the apartment, so frequent trips to the grocery store is a must.

Just a few things to keep in mind
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Old 06-07-2011, 09:58 AM   #19 (permalink)
 
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You should first travel around and get to know a few countries you are interested. I think when it comes to moving to a new country, the biggest obstacle are the job-place to live-insurance kind of issues, and not your SA. Once you have that sorted, you automatically meet people at work who know you are new in the 'town'.

I live in a developing country and it really saddens me to hear people from developed countries about how hard life is over there. Life is hard everywhere and humans are almost always wired to 'not be content' and complain. I know this because I also lived in one of the richest countries in the world, but soon found myself complaining. But in my 'home' country there is real poverty, real fraude/theft and real brainwashing. Poor people are literally run over by Porsche's on crappy roads and nothing is done. Women are being raped & killed and men who kill/rape women claim it was their duty to keep the family honour. I could go on & on. Believe me, no matter what I'd rather be in the rich country than this sad place.
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